Throw Lumber Jill’s | 4650 Ladson Road | Suite 205 Summerville, SC 29485

Axe throwing in Charleston SC

Quick Quote

The Most Exciting Live Entertainment Game in South Carolina

If you’re looking for an adrenaline-filled, pulse-pounding way to have fun all day, grab an axe and get your throw on at Lumber Jill’s! Axe throwing is the newest, most popular live entertainment game in the Lowcountry. It’s kind of like darts…but with axes! Axe throwing is great for a few hours of amusement, stress relief, team building, and even corporate events in Charleston, SC. Whether you’re looking for a great way to celebrate the weekend or want a new idea for your company event, Lumber Jill’s has got you covered.

The Lumber Jill’s revolution began after co-owners Jill and Heath spent a date night with friends throwing axes in Charleston. After having so much fun, the entrepreneurial couple quickly realized they could create their own take on axe throwing. Soon after, Lumber Jill’s was born!

The name Lumber Jill’s isn’t just a play on our co-owner’s name – it involves a really interesting piece of history too. Across the pond, the Women’s Timber Corps “manned” the lumber yards in England while the men were serving in WWII. They affectionately became known as Lumberjills, Britain’s answer to Rosie the Riveter. Without these brave ladies, Lumber Jill’s wouldn’t exist. We would be remiss if we didn’t salute them for the example they set!

At the end of the day, we want to provide every one of our guests with an outstanding axe-throwing experience. So, grab your friends, co-workers, family, or favorite people and join us for an axe-throwing party you won’t soon forget.

Service Area

The Most Exciting Live Entertainment Game in South Carolina

Why is Axe Throwing in Charleston, SC So Popular?

Axes haven’t been this popular in America since “The Shining” hit theaters way back in 1980!

In cities all around the nation, axe-throwing facilities are popping up left and right as a fun, healthy way for people of all ages to congregate and enjoy a night of friendly competition and stress relief. In the last few years, the sport of axe throwing has exploded – so much so that the World Axe Throwing League was assembled in 2017 to coordinate international axe-throwing competitions. Since that time, many axe-throwing events have popped up on national TV stations like ESPN.

Axe Throwing
But why is axe throwing so popular? Here are just a few reasons why Lumber Jill’s and axe throwing as a whole is a hit in South Carolina:
stress-relief
Stress Relief

Perhaps the most popular reason folks love axe throwing in Charleston is for stress relief. We’ve even heard some customers say it’s a cheaper form of therapy! In reality, axe tossing gives you a therapeutic release that is hard to replicate. A few hard throws with an axe and your body releases a flood of endorphins, which help increase your energy, improve your mood, and facilitate healthy blood flow. If you have pent-up anger, nothing feels better than chucking a heavy axe at a target. Hitting a bullseye is even better!

exercise
Exercise

Since axe throwing is such an exhilarating activity, many people don’t realize that they are exercising their arms, legs, abs, pecs, and even back when they come to Lumber Jill’s. Like high-intensity interval training (HIIT) workouts, axe throwing works several muscle groups at once. These exercises strengthen your core and help define your muscles. When coupled with a healthy diet, regular axe-throwing activities can even help you shed a few pounds.

Corporate Comradery
Corporate Comradery

You might be surprised to hear that axe throwing is one of the most sought-after company event ideas in Charleston, SC. Sure, your colleagues might think it’s a little weird to host a corporate meeting at an axe-throwing facility. But once your co-worker hits their target, they’ll quickly understand how much fun they can have. Perhaps more importantly, axe tossing is a safe, fun way to conduct trust exercises and build team morale overall.

Unique Way to Have Fun
Unique Way to Have Fun

When you get right down to it, axe throwing is good, clean, healthy fun. Axe throwing helps relieve shoulder tension, while laughing helps engage your body’s core. When you throw in an adult beverage or two, laughs become easier and fun flows more freely. You can’t help but have the time of your life at Lumber Jill’s in the Lowcountry.

Family Fun
Family Fun

Axe throwing isn’t reserved only for adults – kids can get in on the fun and excitement too. Our warm, inviting atmosphere inspires people to embrace their inner champion, even if they’re under 18. At Lumber Jill’s, we can accommodate kids ages 10 and up. Before we pass them an axe, we will evaluate their skill level to ensure their safety. Contact us today for more info on birthday celebrations and whole facility rentals.

Friday is Family Fun Night

$80 for Family of Four

Get Query

At Your Next Corporate Event

Status quote, average, ordinary…these are qualities that no employer would want out of their employees. So, why host a team-building event at a venue with the same characteristics?

If you’re on the hunt for corporate event venues in Charleston, SC, you just hit the jackpot. We may be a little biased, but Lumber Jill’s is a fantastic corporate event venue for companies looking to try something new.

Axe throwing for corporate events is fun, high-energy, and safe for all your employees. We’re talking an adrenaline-filled day with your own private axe-throwing lanes. Get your clients or your team out of the office and give them something to be excited about!

Here are just a few reasons to reserve our facility for your company get together:

Bury the Hatchet at Your Next Corporate Event
  • No Suit or Tie Required: Feel like taking a casual day? No judgments here! The only thing that matters is that you hit your target (or try your best to do so).
  • No Rain Delays: Unlike some outdoor venues, Lumber Jill’s won’t delay or cancel your event if it starts raining outside. We’re here to make your corporate event more fun, rain or shine.
  • Skill Not Required: Never thrown an axe in your life? Have poor hand-to-eye coordination? Don’t sweat it. Our coaches are know how to teach first-timers the positions and techniques they need to have a blast.
  • Large Groups Welcome: Do you have 20 or more people confirmed for your corporate event? We can make room for your whole team! Give us a shout and let us know about your upcoming event. That way, we can block off your desired day so you can have our entire facility to yourself.
  • Safety First: We take safety very seriously at Lumber Jill’s. As such, we have implemented several safety rules to protect your team and ensure they have the best time possible.

Birthdays, Celebrations, and Reunions, Oh My!

In addition to our standard reservations, we are happy to offer celebration, corporate, and full facility rental packages. Planning a surprise birthday party for your best friend? Celebrating a life event with that special someone? Looking for a spot for your family reunion? Axe throwing in Charleston, SC is the perfect activity for your group! For the most memorable (or hazy) celebration, don’t forget to ask us about alcoholic beverage service and additional lane time.

If you want to spice up your next birthday party or take your bachelorette party to the next level, our celebration package is the perfect fit. This package includes:
  • 2 lanes
  • 1 designated coach
  • 1.5 hours of axe throwing
  • Free shirt for a special guest
  • Table coverings
  • 1 drink for each guest
  • 12 axe throwers
  • 45 total minutes of throwing time
Birthdays, Celebrations, and Reunions, Oh My!

Please note that our celebration package is designed for customers over the age of 12. Two adults must be present at all times.

Common Questions. Helpful Answers.

We understand that axe throwing isn’t your typical date night or even guy’s night activity. We get it – you’re hurling real axes at a target that is only a few feet away. On the surface, that can sound a little scary. But don’t worry, many of our first-time guests have questions about how our process works too.

This is a great question and one that we receive quite often (crazy, right?). Axe throwing at Lumber Jill’s is absolutely safe. In fact, safety is our #1 priority and has been since day one. Our knowledgeable axe-throwing coaches are trained to keep a keen eye on every axe thrower, whether they’re solo or with a group. If, for ANY REASON our coaches feel like a person shouldn’t throw an axe, they will not be permitted to do so. To help keep our facility safe, please refrain from bringing your own axe to Lumber Jill’s. The same goes for any other kind of throwable object.
The easiest, fastest way to book your axe-throwing lane is to make your reservation online. Walk-ins are welcomed, but we cannot guarantee that we will have a spot open for you or your party. For inquiries about corporate events, facility rentals, or large celebrations, please contact us directly at (843)-879-3030.
We suggest you wear something that you find comfy and easy to wear for a few hours. Don’t wear anything that will restrict your movement. The biggest “no-no” we have in terms of dress code is open-toed shoes, which are not allowed. If you pop in for a last-minute axe-throwing session, and need a pair of shoes, don’t fret. We offer shoe rentals for $3 per person.
Unfortunately, we are not permitted to allow outside axes at Lumber Jill’s. The same goes for any other object like throwing stars or throwing knives. We’ve got all you need to have the time of your life, including throwing axes.
Yes, absolutely. We are proud to have a wide selection of alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks to keep you cool and hydrated. If you’re feeling hangry, don’t worry. We have plenty of tasty snacks to munch on if your tummy starts to rumble.

Axe of Kindness

One of the best parts of owning Lumber Jill’s is our ability to give back to our local community. We are always on the hunt for new, inventive ways to serve our citizens. That’s why, once a month, we host Axe of Kindness night to shine a light on an important organization, charity, or good cause. These exciting events give our customers a compelling way to make a real difference in someone’s life.

If you have a donation request or are interested in hosting a fundraiser with Lumber Jill’s, send us your info at

aok@throwlumberjills.com.

Latest News in Charleston

Economists debate talk of Charleston ‘housing bubble,’ but they agree it’s not like 2008

Soaring home prices didn’t dent sales throughout the Charleston area in 2021, and economists predict healthy but moderating sales in the new year.Low interest rates and inbound moves propelled the region’s residential market to a record volume last year of more than 24,000 transactions, even as inventory plummeted more than 50 percent.Buyers forked over an additional $50,000 last year in the median sales price, a 17 percent jump to $350,000 throughout Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton and Dorchester counties. That foll...

Soaring home prices didn’t dent sales throughout the Charleston area in 2021, and economists predict healthy but moderating sales in the new year.

Low interest rates and inbound moves propelled the region’s residential market to a record volume last year of more than 24,000 transactions, even as inventory plummeted more than 50 percent.

Buyers forked over an additional $50,000 last year in the median sales price, a 17 percent jump to $350,000 throughout Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton and Dorchester counties. That follows an 8 percent spike in prices in 2020.

The current setup — fast-rising home prices driven by increased demand and limited supply — generally is a recipe for a classic asset “bubble,” but economists said the circumstances now are different from the crisis that brought down the housing industry in 2008.

“I think we are in a bubble already because of a spike in sales and increased demand,” said Joey Von Nessen, a research economist with the University of South Carolina.

But he doesn’t see it bursting like 14 years ago, when the overheated housing market imploded and triggered a deep recession.

“It’s going to deflate slowly,” Von Nessen predicted. “This is a completely different situation from 2008.”

He said he believes the current buying frenzy will begin to soften in 2022 and hold at a steady rate after the Federal Reserve begins hiking interest rates mid-year and spending from stimulus proceeds ends.

Even so, home prices will likely continue to rise, especially in the Charleston area because of job opportunities and demand from an influx of new residents and general population growth, Von Nessen said.

‘Bubble-like’

Other experts shy away from talk of a housing bubble.

“I don’t think we are headed for a bubble in the housing market because credit has been so tight,” said Mark Vitner, senior economist at Wells Fargo in Charlotte. “That’s usually where we get into trouble, if credit gets too easy.”

Overall, Vitner is “pretty optimistic” about home sales this year, even if the Federal Reserve starts to raise interest rates, as widely expected.

“The Fed is not trying to cool down the home purchase market,” Vitner said. “They are trying to curb some of the speculative market.”

Both he and Von Nessen expect the economy to grow about 4 percent in 2022 as a rebound from the pandemic continues. That’s still healthy but it’s down from the 6 percent growth projected for last year.

“There is still a lot of pent-up demand for houses, trucks and cars,” Vitner said.

Lawrence Yun, an economist with the National Association of Realtors, agreed that there is little cause for concern with spiking home prices.

He said that, unlike 2008, “when there was a thin margin for error, there is solid growth in housing wealth with substantial home equity, and mortgages are good quality.”

Yun pointed out the Charleston market is benefiting from a wave of newcomers migrating from larger metropolitan areas where they can sell their homes for twice as much as the median price in the Lowcountry.

Get the best of the Post and Courier’s Real Estate news, handpicked and delivered to your inbox each Saturday.

“If they go to Charleston and buy a house, they can pay cash and have money left over,” Yun said.

Vitner of Wells Fargo said vacation home purchases also can drive up prices in popular areas such as Charleston.

“Home prices in second-home markets were rising faster than in other home markets,” he said. “It’s one issue that looks bubble-like, but it’s not an issue that will persist in the long run.”

Frank Nothaft, an economist with property information service CoreLogic, also said the housing market is stable.

“It is unlikely that the Charleston market is in a bubble because of the underbuilt housing market and high-quality mortgage originations,” he said. “Vacancy rates are at a generational low, and prudent loan underwriting has prevented high-risk lending.”

Cost to borrow

It remains to be seen whether rising interest rates will ease the market pressures. Still cheap by historical standards, mortgages are now pricier compared to a year ago.

During the second week of 2022, the average rate on a 30-year home loan jumped to 3.45 percent, according to home loan financier Freddie Mac. A year earlier, the figure was 2.79 percent.

Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist, said the increase has not yet affected buying, but it could dampen demand because home prices continue to accelerate.

Online real estate firm Redfin said January could turn out to be the most competitive month of buying so far as would-be purchasers rush to buy before borrowing costs move even higher.

The median price nationally rose to an all-time high of $365,000 to start the year.

“Conditions are becoming increasingly challenging for first-time homebuyers, who will have to compete against more experienced buyers who are willing to do whatever it takes to win,” said Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather. “But I expect that by the time mortgage rates increase to 3.6 percent, competition will settle down quickly to levels similar to late 2018.”

Nothaft of CoreLogic said he believes interest on a 30-year, fixed-rate loan will rise to about 3.5 percent by year’s end, just over half a percentage point higher than the average rate in 2021, and “moderate buyer demand as the erosion of affordability takes a toll.”

He added that if rates rise higher or quicker than the forecast, the sales market and home price growth will slow further and faster.

He also pointed out available housing stock could rise in the new year from new construction, homeowners who delayed selling during the pandemic and distressed properties.

Yun, of the National Association of Realtors, said the housing market overall will continue to be strong, but not as “intensely competitive as last year,” when multiple purchase offers sparked bidding wars. He predicted home prices nationally will increase by 3 percent to 5 percent while Nothaft pegs the jump at about 8 percent.

For first-time buyers, challenges lie ahead.

“Incomes have yet to catch up, and now they are facing higher interest rates,” Yun said.

Prospective buyers could widen their geographic search for cheaper homes in outlying suburbs, he added, but it will mean longer commutes unless they can work from home.

14 unwritten rules of Charleston, SC

There is a certain pride that comes with living or growing up in Charleston. Often, it manifests itself in quirky ways, like specific city knowledge, trends, and colloquialisms. Think: What is proper etiquette when walking down King Street? We’ll get into that. If you happen to be lucky enough to be from the Holy City, here are a few unwritten rules you may know to be true submitted by readers on ...

There is a certain pride that comes with living or growing up in Charleston. Often, it manifests itself in quirky ways, like specific city knowledge, trends, and colloquialisms. Think: What is proper etiquette when walking down King Street? We’ll get into that.

If you happen to be lucky enough to be from the Holy City, here are a few unwritten rules you may know to be true submitted by readers on Instagram + through emailand if you’re not from Charleston, you might want to save this article for future reference.

“Never talk politics at Happy Hour. Always discuss the weather.”Reader Ken B.

“During rainy season, keep an eye on the tide charts when planning to drive through downtown.” Reader Erin C.

“Don’t be using the horn when driving unless it’s an absolute emergency and even then, probably don’t use the horn.” Anon Reader

“Handwritten thank you notes are a must!” – Reader Ellen D.

“King Street sidewalks:

“Keep an eye out for the one-way streets ” – @charleston_food_spot

“Don’t have any part of your tires on the asphalt when you park at the beach … $50 parking ticket automatically (might be higher now).” – @thejoelsario

“Don’t feed the seagulls!” – @holycityglass

“When the [Krispy Kreme] hot sign is on, you always have to stop…” – @stan_kablick

“Always have an umbrella during the summer, regardless of the forecast ” – @kateringram

“When merging on to 17 N. from Coming St. downtown, KEEP moving! Change lanes LATER!” – @eruss28

“You don’t have to pay the meter on Sundays!” – @charleston_food_spot

“East Bay from the aquarium to Harris Teeter is a 2 lane street, but it only fits one car.” – @notcharliehabakus

“Shop local. Support local. Eat local…” – @jeanneaeverett

Charleston COVID testing site closed amid multi-state investigations

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- A free COVID-19 testing company at the center of several state investigations announced its locations would be temporarily closed beginning Friday.The “pause in all operations,” is expected to be in place until Jan. 21 at all 300 Center for Covid Control locations, including the one on ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- A free COVID-19 testing company at the center of several state investigations announced its locations would be temporarily closed beginning Friday.

The “pause in all operations,” is expected to be in place until Jan. 21 at all 300 Center for Covid Control locations, including the one on Clements Ferry Road.

Center for Covid Control has come under scrutiny in recent days for its testing practices. The Oregon Department of Justice opened an investigation into the company in addition to several other states.

In a statement released Thursday the company said it would pause operations due to “unusually high patient demand” and to focus on retraining staff.

“Center for Covid Control is committed to serving our patients in the safest, most accurate and mostcompliant manner. Regrettably, due to our rapid growth and the unprecedented recent demand for testing, we haven’t been able to meet all our commitments,” CCC founder and CEO Aleya Siyaj said in a release. “We’ve made this difficult decision to temporarily pause all operations until we are confident that all collection sites are meeting our high standards for quality.”

USA Today reports an internal memo was sent to all “owners and managers” cited “increased scrutiny by the media into the operations of our collection sites” over the past week.

The website claims the company is CDC-approved and partnered with a licensed laboratory named Doctors Clinical Lab. It also links to a Twitter page and Instagram page. The Twitter account is listed as “suspended” and the Instagram page is filled with comments calling the company “fake” and “a scam.”

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control does not have Center for Covid Control listed as an official testing location on its website and said according to DHEC records, the site is not certified by CLIA for South Carolina. We reached out to the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services, which certifies testing sites and according to a CMS spokesperson Doctors Clinical Lab is certified in Illinois.

DHEC reports the department has not received test results from Center for COVID Control’s Charleston site which has been open for five months. All cases of COVID-19 are required to be reported to DHEC.

“Upon notification of an alleged fraudulent laboratory (Center for COVID Control), DHEC’s CLIA program on Jan. 12 notified CMS of the allegations,” a DHEC spokesperson said. “DHEC is working with CMS to determine next steps based on CMS’s determination of the appropriate response.”

Why this global life sciences COO believes relocation to Charleston, SC, was key to achieving next-level success

There are many reasons why a life sciences business might make the monumental decision to relocate their company’s headquarters or manufacturing base either nationally or internationally. Choosing exactly where to move is a significant challenge that requires extensive research, visits and careful evaluation.Discover what has made Charleston a thriving life sciences hub. This whitepaper contains the key data decision makers need to understand the full ecosystem, from talent and workforce through research and innovation to logist...

There are many reasons why a life sciences business might make the monumental decision to relocate their company’s headquarters or manufacturing base either nationally or internationally. Choosing exactly where to move is a significant challenge that requires extensive research, visits and careful evaluation.

Discover what has made Charleston a thriving life sciences hub. This whitepaper contains the key data decision makers need to understand the full ecosystem, from talent and workforce through research and innovation to logistics and connectivity. A must-read for life sciences enterprises looking to expand or relocate.

by Charleston Regional Development Alliance

This was a challenge that Tom McKenna, chief operating officer at Thorne HealthTech, faced first-hand when he led the company’s relocation some 3,500 miles (5,600km) across the US, from a small town in northern Idaho to one within greater Charleston, South Carolina. Here, he shares his experience of the big move and why he feels the relocation was more than worthwhile.

Can you tell us more about Thorne HealthTech?

Thorne was founded in 1989 as a manufacturer of premium-quality nutritional supplements. We have since created digital health solutions providing diagnostics and analytics to identify unmet nutritional deficiencies and provide world-class wellness and prevention education. Our goal is to help people at all stages of life to live and age more gracefully.

We believe the future of wellness is personal. For the first time in history, with the cutting-edge advancements in sequencing technology, artificial intelligence and nutritional research, we can now efficiently offer personalised approaches to wellness, which were previously reserved for late-stage disease care or academic research. We strive to be the differentiated leader in the wellness industry by deploying our scientifically rigorous approach to supporting personalised health and wellness.

What prompted the move from Idaho and what were you looking for in your new location?

In 2013, we recognised that by 2018 we would be out of capacity at our manufacturing facility. While there was plenty of available land in the area, our decision not to expand locally was based on utility capacity, lack of local labour and challenges in attracting talent, as well as the significant distance from the airport and major roadways.

We first looked at around 1,000 different options across all 50 states. We narrowed it to 100, and I personally visited every one of those over a two-year period. During that time, we were introduced to South Carolina’s then governor of state, [Nikki Haley]. She suggested the Charleston region and we looked at some sites. The place we ended up was a no-brainer compared with all the other options. After two years of trying to find a home, when we finally came to Charleston we thought ‘that’s it’!

The key criteria in our decision-making included a business-friendly environment; a robust, affordable and available talent pool with comparable salaries to Idaho; proximity to the local airport and major transit ways; an appealing area for staff to relocate; and attractive state and local incentives. Charleston ticked all these boxes.

What are the risks during a business relocation and how did you mitigate these?

One risk is losing or damaging a critical asset or transitional requirement among the significant multitude of moving parts. This required detailed, almost military-like planning and execution to move some 2,500 pieces of equipment, furnishings and tens of thousands of inventory items.

To make sure there are no operational disruptions, you also need a certain critical mass of existing staff to move with you, in many cases early, and to stay at least for a while to initiate operations, recruit and train new staff. We worked with Charleston’s economic development organisation called Charleston Regional Development Alliance (CRDA). CRDA helped facilitate and participate in 14 ‘familiarisation’ trips for a total of 140 employees and nearly 300 persons. We would kick the trip off with a seminar on the area and the community, led by CRDA. We would then hop on a bus and CRDA would take us on a three-hour tour around different neighbourhoods and areas, down to the beach and out for a barbeque.

It was very informal and almost familial, and to their credit they showed up 14 times to do these things, each time with welcome bags. CRDA was very helpful in getting folks to see the value of the local community. In fact, CRDA was critical in helping us convince 40% of our Idaho-based staff to relocate to South Carolina. When we got here, they were very helpful on the hiring side too.

What attracted your employees to the Charleston region?

What the greater Charleston area provides is a culture that is perhaps not a lot different from the Pacific Northwest. Our employees love to be in the outdoors – they love to hunt, fish, camp and hike. You can do all those things that you could do in Idaho here in Charleston. The big difference is that instead of doing those things in a short window in the summer, in Charleston you can enjoy them for 12 months of the year, thanks to the climate.

The ocean was another big attraction for folks, as was the proximity to multiple downtowns. In Idaho, the closest city was a two-hour drive away. Here, you can generally be in downtown Charleston in 30 minutes or less, depending on where you live. At the same time, it is not a huge metropolitan area like New York City, Philadelphia or Washington DC, for example.

Are there any ways Thorne HealthTech is more competitive with operations in Charleston?

We are now able to attract more diversified and talented staff, in greater numbers. The proximity to the airport and interstate highway transit has greatly reduced our freight costs and improved our supply chain management and timelines. When we wanted to ship and receive materials in northern Idaho, the largest interstate was an hour away. Here, it is just blocks away.

Our new facility and others we are now expanding into have materially improved our productivity and lowered the cost of operations. We now produce more items in-house and have greater control over our supply, and as a result have dramatically reduced our order fulfilment timelines, which are now comparable to Amazon. We continue to feel we made the right decision in our move to Charleston.

Discover why global life sciences businesses are choosing this thriving region. Download the white paper ‘Charleston, USA: A life sciences hub’ here.

Charleston launches composting pilot program to keep food waste out of the landfill

A new program run by the city of Charleston aims to put residents’ food scraps to good use.Beginning Jan. 23, Charleston residents can bring personal food waste to one of three designated compost drop-off sites. The waste will then be transported to the Charleston County Bees Ferry Compost Facility.“It’s easy. It’s really the natural process of recycling organic matter and by doing so you prevent a lot of waste from going to a landfill,” said Katie McKain, the city of Charleston’s Director of...

A new program run by the city of Charleston aims to put residents’ food scraps to good use.

Beginning Jan. 23, Charleston residents can bring personal food waste to one of three designated compost drop-off sites. The waste will then be transported to the Charleston County Bees Ferry Compost Facility.

“It’s easy. It’s really the natural process of recycling organic matter and by doing so you prevent a lot of waste from going to a landfill,” said Katie McKain, the city of Charleston’s Director of Sustainability.

City officials believe there will be no shortage of waste to work with as they estimate residents dispose of 15,000 pounds of it per year. It makes up a quarter of solid waste collected in the city, a city press release states.

Diverting food waste away from landfills and into compost facilities allows it to decompose naturally. When broken down, food waste creates natural fertilizer for soil.

This lessens reliance on chemical fertilizers and landfills, both of which cause pollution. Using soil fertilized by compost at city parks will also help them better absorb storm water.

Matthew Nowlin, an associate professor at the College of Charleston who researches environmental policy, said the city’s program is well thought out.

“I think it’s a positive policy and it’s a positive change,” he said. “It has potential to be effective in reducing waste.”

The challenge, he said, will be getting residents to pick up new habits.

“From the individual perspective, managing waste has been pretty easy ... we throw stuff away, it gets picked up, and we never have to think about it again,” he said.

McKain said at the conclusion of the pilot program, the city will evaluate what went well and what can be improved if more funding is available.

“We are testing options and working with limited funding so we are trying to figure out what will work,” she said. “Hopefully we will be able to expand it to last longer and expand to new drop sites.”

It will run for six months with the possibility of an extension based on participation and funding.

Qualifying waste includes fruits, vegetables, coffee grounds, tea filters, cooked meats, fish, shells, bones, milk, cheese, yogurt and food-soiled paper towels, napkins or boxes. The program will also accept processed food such as cereal, pizza, chips, crackers, cakes and plate scrapings.

The compost facility has wider capabilities than a backyard compost bin, the city says. Typically, meat, fish, bones, dairy and soiled paper products are not recommended for backyard composting.

The compost program will not accept raw meat, plastic items, chemical cleaners, fats, oils, grease and non-food items such as wood and yard debris.

To participate in the program, residents must enroll at www.charleston-sc.gov/compost.

Interested residents can also get free reusable compost caddies by signing up for one of two composting workshops held 11 a.m.-noon Jan. 22 and 5:30-6:30 p.m. Jan. 25. Caddies are available for the first 200 registrants.

Residents can deposit food waste at Ackerman Park at 55 Sycamore Ave., Corrine Jones Park at 36 Marlow Drive and Medway Park at 2101 Medway Road.

The program is part of the city’s Climate Action Plan which sets environmental policy goals for Charleston.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
This error message is only visible to WordPress admins

Error: No connected account.

Please go to the Instagram Feed settings page to connect an account.

follow us on: