Throw Lumber Jill’s | 4650 Ladson Road | Suite 205 Summerville, SC 29485

Axe throwing in Charleston SC

Quick Quote

The Most Exciting Live Entertainment Game in South Carolina

If you're looking for an adrenaline-filled, pulse-pounding way to have fun all day, grab an axe and get your throw on at Lumber Jill's! Axe throwing is the newest, most popular live entertainment game in the Lowcountry. It's kind of like darts...but with axes! Axe throwing is great for a few hours of amusement, stress relief, team building, and even corporate events in Charleston, SC. Whether you're looking for a great way to celebrate the weekend or want a new idea for your company event, Lumber Jill's has got you covered.

The Lumber Jill's revolution began after co-owners Jill and Heath spent a date night with friends throwing axes in Charleston. After having so much fun, the entrepreneurial couple quickly realized they could create their own take on axe throwing. Soon after, Lumber Jill's was born!

The name Lumber Jill's isn't just a play on our co-owner's name - it involves a really interesting piece of history too. Across the pond, the Women's Timber Corps "manned" the lumber yards in England while the men were serving in WWII. They affectionately became known as Lumberjills, Britain's answer to Rosie the Riveter. Without these brave ladies, Lumber Jill's wouldn't exist. We would be remiss if we didn't salute them for the example they set!

At the end of the day, we want to provide every one of our guests with an outstanding axe-throwing experience. So, grab your friends, co-workers, family, or favorite people and join us for an axe-throwing party you won't soon forget.

Service Area

Axe Throwing Leagues Charleston, SC

Why is Axe Throwing in Charleston, SC So Popular?

Axes haven't been this popular in America since "The Shining" hit theaters way back in 1980!

In cities all around the nation, axe-throwing facilities are popping up left and right as a fun, healthy way for people of all ages to congregate and enjoy a night of friendly competition and stress relief. In the last few years, the sport of axe throwing has exploded - so much so that the World Axe Throwing League was assembled in 2017 to coordinate international axe-throwing competitions. Since that time, many axe-throwing events have popped up on national TV stations like ESPN.

 Axe Throwing Charleston, SC
But why is axe throwing so popular? Here are just a few reasons why Lumber Jill's and axe throwing as a whole is a hit in South Carolina:
stress-relief
Stress Relief

Perhaps the most popular reason folks love axe throwing in Charleston is for stress relief. We've even heard some customers say it's a cheaper form of therapy! In reality, axe tossing gives you a therapeutic release that is hard to replicate. A few hard throws with an axe and your body releases a flood of endorphins, which help increase your energy, improve your mood, and facilitate healthy blood flow. If you have pent-up anger, nothing feels better than chucking a heavy axe at a target. Hitting a bullseye is even better!

exercise
Exercise

Since axe throwing is such an exhilarating activity, many people don't realize that they are exercising their arms, legs, abs, pecs, and even back when they come to Lumber Jill's. Like high-intensity interval training (HIIT) workouts, axe throwing works several muscle groups at once. These exercises strengthen your core and help define your muscles. When coupled with a healthy diet, regular axe-throwing activities can even help you shed a few pounds.

Corporate Comradery
Corporate Comradery

You might be surprised to hear that axe throwing is one of the most sought-after company event ideas in Charleston, SC. Sure, your colleagues might think it's a little weird to host a corporate meeting at an axe-throwing facility. But once your co-worker hits their target, they'll quickly understand how much fun they can have. Perhaps more importantly, axe tossing is a safe, fun way to conduct trust exercises and build team morale overall.

Unique Way to Have Fun
Unique Way to Have Fun

When you get right down to it, axe throwing is good, clean, healthy fun. Axe throwing helps relieve shoulder tension, while laughing helps engage your body's core. When you throw in an adult beverage or two, laughs become easier and fun flows more freely. You can't help but have the time of your life at Lumber Jill's in the Lowcountry.

Family Fun
Family Fun

Axe throwing isn't reserved only for adults - kids can get in on the fun and excitement too. Our warm, inviting atmosphere inspires people to embrace their inner champion, even if they're under 18. At Lumber Jill's, we can accommodate kids ages 10 and up. Before we pass them an axe, we will evaluate their skill level to ensure their safety. Contact us today for more info on birthday celebrations and whole facility rentals.

At Your Next Corporate Event

Status quote, average, ordinary...these are qualities that no employer would want out of their employees. So, why host a team-building event at a venue with the same characteristics?

If you're on the hunt for corporate event venues in Charleston, SC, you just hit the jackpot. We may be a little biased, but Lumber Jill's is a fantastic corporate event venue for companies looking to try something new.

Axe throwing for corporate events is fun, high-energy, and safe for all your employees. We're talking an adrenaline-filled day with your own private axe-throwing lanes. Get your clients or your team out of the office and give them something to be excited about!

Here are just a few reasons to reserve our facility for your company get together:

 Axe Throwing Center Charleston, SC
  • No Suit or Tie Required: Feel like taking a casual day? No judgments here! The only thing that matters is that you hit your target (or try your best to do so).
  • No Rain Delays: Unlike some outdoor venues, Lumber Jill's won't delay or cancel your event if it starts raining outside. We're here to make your corporate event more fun, rain or shine.
  • Skill Not Required: Never thrown an axe in your life? Have poor hand-to-eye coordination? Don't sweat it. Our coaches are know how to teach first-timers the positions and techniques they need to have a blast.
  • Large Groups Welcome: Do you have 20 or more people confirmed for your corporate event? We can make room for your whole team! Give us a shout and let us know about your upcoming event. That way, we can block off your desired day so you can have our entire facility to yourself.
  • Safety First: We take safety very seriously at Lumber Jill's. As such, we have implemented several safety rules to protect your team and ensure they have the best time possible.

Birthdays, Celebrations, and Reunions, Oh My!

In addition to our standard reservations, we are happy to offer celebration, corporate, and full facility rental packages. Planning a surprise birthday party for your best friend? Celebrating a life event with that special someone? Looking for a spot for your family reunion? Axe throwing in Charleston, SC is the perfect activity for your group! For the most memorable (or hazy) celebration, don't forget to ask us about alcoholic beverage service and additional lane time.

If you want to spice up your next birthday party or take your bachelorette party to the next level, our celebration package is the perfect fit. This package includes:
  • 2 lanes
  • 1 designated coach
  • 1.5 hours of axe throwing
  • Free shirt for a special guest
  • Table coverings
  • 1 drink for each guest
  • 12 axe throwers
  • 45 total minutes of throwing time
 Axe Throwing Location Charleston, SC

Please note that our celebration package is designed for customers over the age of 12. Two adults must be present at all times.

Common Questions. Helpful Answers.

We understand that axe throwing isn't your typical date night or even guy's night activity. We get it - you're hurling real axes at a target that is only a few feet away. On the surface, that can sound a little scary. But don't worry, many of our first-time guests have questions about how our process works too.

This is a great question and one that we receive quite often (crazy, right?). Axe throwing at Lumber Jill's is absolutely safe. In fact, safety is our #1 priority and has been since day one. Our knowledgeable axe-throwing coaches are trained to keep a keen eye on every axe thrower, whether they're solo or with a group. If, for ANY REASON our coaches feel like a person shouldn't throw an axe, they will not be permitted to do so. To help keep our facility safe, please refrain from bringing your own axe to Lumber Jill's. The same goes for any other kind of throwable object.
The easiest, fastest way to book your axe-throwing lane is to make your reservation online. Walk-ins are welcomed, but we cannot guarantee that we will have a spot open for you or your party. For inquiries about corporate events, facility rentals, or large celebrations, please contact us directly at (843)-879-3030.
We suggest you wear something that you find comfy and easy to wear for a few hours. Don't wear anything that will restrict your movement. The biggest "no-no" we have in terms of dress code is open-toed shoes, which are not allowed. If you pop in for a last-minute axe-throwing session, and need a pair of shoes, don't fret. We offer shoe rentals for $3 per person.
Unfortunately, we are not permitted to allow outside axes at Lumber Jill's. The same goes for any other object like throwing stars or throwing knives. We've got all you need to have the time of your life, including throwing axes.
Yes, absolutely. We are proud to have a wide selection of alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks to keep you cool and hydrated. If you're feeling hangry, don't worry. We have plenty of tasty snacks to munch on if your tummy starts to rumble.

Axe of Kindness

One of the best parts of owning Lumber Jill's is our ability to give back to our local community. We are always on the hunt for new, inventive ways to serve our citizens. That's why, once a month, we host Axe of Kindness night to shine a light on an important organization, charity, or good cause. These exciting events give our customers a compelling way to make a real difference in someone's life.

If you have a donation request or are interested in hosting a fundraiser with Lumber Jill's, send us your info at

aok@throwlumberjills.com.

Latest News in Charleston, SC

Solution Development Lifecycle

Every solution submitted to our team goes through a rigorous analysis phase to understand the scope, need, value, and market competition. Key evaluation criteria include:Advisory CouncilThe Advisory Council will provide advice and industry knowledge gained through years of experience in their respective fields. The council will provide an unbiased perspective to the MUSC Health Solutions team to evaluate the sustainability, profitability, and potential success of a solution or opportunity. The council will also present opport...

Every solution submitted to our team goes through a rigorous analysis phase to understand the scope, need, value, and market competition. Key evaluation criteria include:

Advisory Council

The Advisory Council will provide advice and industry knowledge gained through years of experience in their respective fields. The council will provide an unbiased perspective to the MUSC Health Solutions team to evaluate the sustainability, profitability, and potential success of a solution or opportunity. The council will also present opportunities for MUSC Health Solutions to pursue if appropriate.

The council members have backgrounds in various industries: Finance, agriculture, economics, healthcare, retail, computer science and information exchange, hospitality, distribution, data science, tele communications, digital health, biotechnology, construction, public relations, etc.

Internal Collaborations

How we partner: The MUSC Foundation for Research Development (FRD) and the Zucker Institute for Applied Neurosciences (ZIAN) joined forces to become the Zucker Institute for Innovation Commercialization. Many solutions include the disclosure of intellectual property. This institute supports our endeavors so that the creators of our solutions, whether it be technology, workflow, or know-how, are recognized and rewarded for their work and well as supply select opportunities to MUSC Health Solutions which require additional support - they help to populate the portfolio.

How we partner: When new technologies require testing in a clinical setting, we often look to BMIC to support building infrastructure in sandbox research environments. This group is equipped with strong technicians and developers that support MUSC Health Solution pilots.

How we partner: Health Solutions often brings opportunities to the organization which result in mutually beneficial partnerships, which we work with External Affairs to facilitate and help establish.

How we partner: We partner with the Office of Innovation to identify pain points across the organization and find solutions for them. Whether an idea is fully developed or in early in its lifecycle, the Office of Innovation engages us whenever our expertise can help to accelerate the development and delivery of a solution.

How we partner: Many solutions that MUSC Health Solutions produces require input, feedback, or support from the Office of Telehealth. They are always willing to explore new ideas and opportunities to deliver and co-develop innovative services to patients and clients.

How we partner: All solutions require some level of engagement from the Office of General Counsel. The legal team provides expert knowledge in forming relationships, reviewing and recommending relevant legal documentation, and risk management.

How we partner: Solutions has an assigned Business Relationship Manager (BRM) that serves as the liaison between our team and IT team to understand the IT lift and resource requirements for solutions that come through our pipeline. Our partnership enables clear communication to ensure efforts are aligned and solutions in our health system's application archive are not duplicative. MUSC Health Solutions is able to optimize the products/services across the entire health system’s ecosystem and Information Solutions seeks out the required technologic support to move things forward.

How we partner: In partnership with MUSC's IS Security team, MUSC Health Solutions serves as liaison between them and external vendor security teams. By doing so, we are able to manage risk appropriately by vetting and reviewing all solutions, vendors, and services that we intend to implement or partner with. We adhere to strict protocols and requirements from MUSC’s IS Security team, which we take very seriously to protect all proprietary data and maintain the integrity of our systems.

How we partner: Spin-companies and new services require a great deal of support from the marketing department, whether that be creating campaigns or name trademarking. They are highly qualified, have access to excellent marketing tools, and have a network of resources to ensure that we are communicating and messaging to the right audience in most effective, efficient, and easy way!

Charleston Co. sets aside funds for affordable housing, emergency repairs

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Charleston County has dedicated tens of millions of dollars in an effort to increase housing availability and to keep seniors living in their homes.Council has put in place a $3 million emergency home repair program and have set aside $20 million in American Rescue Plan Act funds for affordable housing efforts.Some of the repairs eligible for the emergency repair program include roofs, windows and floors as well as sustainability and weathering.County Council Chairman Teddie Pryor said the...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Charleston County has dedicated tens of millions of dollars in an effort to increase housing availability and to keep seniors living in their homes.

Council has put in place a $3 million emergency home repair program and have set aside $20 million in American Rescue Plan Act funds for affordable housing efforts.

Some of the repairs eligible for the emergency repair program include roofs, windows and floors as well as sustainability and weathering.

County Council Chairman Teddie Pryor said the county will be going into the community to see who needs these emergency repairs first, and soon after, there will be an online application for people to apply for help.

“To keep housing affordable, you keep people in them,” Pryor said. “If people can’t afford to stay in because of their floors, their roofs, their windows, then the house is boarded up. They move out, and the house is no longer affordable.”

Those who are eligible for the program will then get a call from the county to get the repair process underway.

“We set a criteria of 62 and above targeting the seniors, you know, but we can go back and revisit that,” Pryor said. “Those are the most vulnerable people. They can’t do it on a fixed income, so we want to make sure they’ll be able to stay in their house and won’t be boarded up.”

“County council as a whole is concerned about the least of these, and these are the folk that we’re trying to help,” Charleston County Councilmember Henry Darby said. “That they would be able to stay in their homes and to maintain a lifestyle that’s enduring.”

As for the affordable housing program, Pryor said county staff is working on a plan to spend the $20 million. That plan is scheduled to come back before council next month.

Charleston County Councilmember Robert Wehrman said he has high hopes for what may come out of that plan.

“A tool that efficiently manages these funds and gets them to be it developers, be it non-profits, be it housing authorities, whomever can create and preserve more units in an efficient way,” Wehrman said.

Pryor meanwhile, hopes the $20 million that was set aside could turn into a regional effort.

“Let’s just say, for instance, North Charleston, we have land, we got money,” he said. “Dorchester County may have land. We have funding. That way it’s this collaborative effort and gets us where we need to be versus going out to buy land and do it on our own.”

The chairman said there will be a second phase of the emergency home repair program in the future, but added that the county is focused on helping as many people as possible for now.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

National retailer REI to open 3rd SC location

Specialty outdoor retailer REI Co-op has announced plans to open its third South Carolina location.The new store is expected to open in Mount Pleasant this fall, according to an REI news release. It will employ about 50 full- and part-time employees, a company representative told SC Biz News.The company declined to reveal the cost of the project.The 21,500-square-foot store, to be located 1720 Shoremeade Road in Indigo Sq...

Specialty outdoor retailer REI Co-op has announced plans to open its third South Carolina location.

The new store is expected to open in Mount Pleasant this fall, according to an REI news release. It will employ about 50 full- and part-time employees, a company representative told SC Biz News.

The company declined to reveal the cost of the project.

The 21,500-square-foot store, to be located 1720 Shoremeade Road in Indigo Square, will offer an assortment of apparel, gear and expertise for camping, cycling, running, fitness, hiking, paddling, climbing and more, the release stated.

The location will also feature a full-service bike shop that will be staffed by certified mechanics.

“We look forward to opening a third store in South Carolina and being a resource to REI members and the broader outdoor community in and around Mount Pleasant,” Jacki Harp, REI regional director, said in the release. “Our local team will also seek partnerships with outdoor nonprofits to support their efforts in protecting natural places and welcoming more people outside.”

REI, which is headquartered in Seattle, also has locations in Columbia (2300 Bull St.), which opened in 2020, and Greenville (1140 Woodruff Road, Suite 400), which opened in 2011.

REI was the first national retailer lured to the 181-acre, mixed-use BullStreet District development in 2019. Since its August 2020 opening, it has been joined by a Starbucks at the intersection of Bull and Freed streets, and several other commercial and residential real estate projects have sprung up around it.

Employment information is available online at rei.jobs.

REI, the nation’s largest consumer co-op, has more than 167,000 members in South Carolina, and more than 28,000 members in the region, according to the release.

Last year, the co-op invested $7.1 million in 45-plus nonprofits across the country, the release stated. Over the last five years, the co-op has invested nearly $184,000 in South Carolina-based land agencies and nonprofit partners. Recent recipients include Anne Springs Close Greenway, Conestee Foundation Inc., Friends of Harbison State Forest, Friends of Paris Mountain, Friends of Sesqui and Palmetto Conservation Foundation.

Also last year, the co-op launched the REI Cooperative Action Fund, a community-supported public charity. Black Girls RUN! Foundation chapters in Charleston, Columbia, Florence/Myrtle Beach and Greenville/Spartanburg received grants in the first round of funding.

10 unique parks to explore in Charleston, SC

With so many beautiful outdoor spaces to explore in the Lowcountry, it can be hard to know where to start. That’s why we rounded up 10 unique parks to explore in the Charleston area. Bonus: All have under $10 admission.Now, park yourself in a comfy chair + scroll through this list to fuel your local wanderlust.1.Edisto Beach State Park, 8377 State Cabin Rd., Edisto Island | 7 a.m.-6 p.m. dail...

With so many beautiful outdoor spaces to explore in the Lowcountry, it can be hard to know where to start. That’s why we rounded up 10 unique parks to explore in the Charleston area. Bonus: All have under $10 admission.

Now, park yourself in a comfy chair + scroll through this list to fuel your local wanderlust.

1.Edisto Beach State Park, 8377 State Cabin Rd., Edisto Island | 7 a.m.-6 p.m. daily | $8 | This 1,255-acre park has an Environmental Learning Center with interactive displays + live-animal exhibits and a 1.5-mile palmetto-lined beach.

2. Lighthouse Inlet Heritage Preserve, 1750 E Ashley Ave., Folly Beach | Open sunrise to sunset daily | $1 | Explore marshland and maritime forests, view the Morris Island Lighthouse, and go on a bird walk (pssst: the next one is on June 10).

3. Stono River County Park, 3580 McLeod Mill Rd., Johns Island | 7 a.m.-8 p.m. daily May-August | $1 | Stroll along the marsh boardwalk leading to an island in the Stono River and soak up views of the Limehouse Bridge at this 85.5-acre site.

4. White Point Garden, 2 Murray Blvd. | 9 a.m.-sunset daily | Free | This waterfront park in the historic district features views of Fort Sumter and a large gazebo — take a look at the display of Civil War cannons.

5. Folly Beach County Park, 1100 W. Ashley Ave., Folly Beach | 8 a.m.-sunset daily | Free | Discover this spot on the west end of Folly Beach. Skimmer Flats, an Eastern Brown Pelican rookery, is visible at the west end of the park.

6. Charles Towne Landing, 1500 Old Towne Rd. | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. daily April-October | $12 | This state historic site is the birthplace of South Carolina — check out the Adventure, Charleston’s only 17th century replica ship docked in Old Towne Creek.

7. Laurel Hill County Park, 1251 Park West Blvd., Mt. Pleasant | Sunrise-sunset daily | $1 | Wander through 745 acres featuring several miles of unpaved trails, an oak allée with large open meadows, and a small lake with a viewing overlook.

8. North Charleston Riverfront Park, 1061 Everglades Ave., North Charleston | 6 a.m.-10 p.m. daily | Free | This waterfront site on the banks of the Cooper River is home to the Charleston Naval Base Memorial and The Admiral’s House, a neo-classical mansion.

9. Huntington Beach State Park, 16148 Ocean Hwy., Murrell’s Inlet | 6 a.m.-6 p.m. daily | $8 | Discover three miles of beaches, over 300 species of birds, and a National Historic Landmark at this park.

10. Colonial Dorchester State Historic Site, 300 State Park Rd., Summerville | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. daily | $3 | Tour the site of a former village, walk through the historic cemetery, and see the fort built in 1757 made of oyster shell concrete — the nation’s best-preserved tabby fortification.

Grab your binoculars, bug spray + walking shoes and reconnect with nature this summer.

Hot SC summer job market gets a lukewarm response as fewer youth apply

The cool, crisp water, still and clear, sits like a beacon, calling residents sweltering from the South Carolina summer heat to break the surface with a resounding splash.But not on Mondays and Tuesdays at some of the Charleston area’s community pools.At Splash Zone Waterpark in James Island County Park you can ride down the 200-foot-long slides and relax in the leisure pool, but there will be no lazying down the river.That attraction won’t open this season, and the park cut admission to reflect the closure....

The cool, crisp water, still and clear, sits like a beacon, calling residents sweltering from the South Carolina summer heat to break the surface with a resounding splash.

But not on Mondays and Tuesdays at some of the Charleston area’s community pools.

At Splash Zone Waterpark in James Island County Park you can ride down the 200-foot-long slides and relax in the leisure pool, but there will be no lazying down the river.

That attraction won’t open this season, and the park cut admission to reflect the closure.

And if you were looking for a more thrilling ride, you won’t get it at Splash Island waterpark at Mount Pleasant Palmetto Islands County Park.

That too was closed because the park system doesn’t have enough lifeguards to keep swimmers safe.

About a third of public pools across the U.S. can’t find enough lifeguards, leading some to reduce hours or close altogether, the American Lifeguard Association said.

Charleston area pools are among them.

Despite increased recruitment efforts this year, the Charleston County Parks and Recreation office said in a press release that some facilities have remained impacted by the current labor climate.

“We have experienced a shortage of lifeguards this year,” said Sarah Reynolds, public information coordinator for county parks.

It has mainly affected two waterparks — Splash Island, which has cut back from seven days a week in previous summers to four days a week this year, Wednesday through Saturday, and Splash Zone on James Island. That park is open only five out of seven days, from Wednesday to Sunday.

While apartment and private pools can operate without a lifeguard, simply warning bathers to “swim at their own risk,” pools run by towns and municipalities must ensure the safety of their swimmers and be amply manned by lifeguards.

Charleston public pools follow national lifeguarding standards, including those set forth by the Starfish Aquatics Institute, which requires a specific number of certified lifeguards on duty at all times.

“We have been fortunate with our other parks,” Reynolds said. Whirlin’ Waters in North Charleston and the beach parks are open with lifeguards and haven’t changed operations.

At the four Charleston city pools — one 50-meter open year-round, one water-heated pool available nine months out of the year, and two summer-only facilities — the ability to shift qualified staff members allowed them to remain open and mostly unaffected.

“We have to remain fluid,” Laurie Yarbrough, Department of Recreation director, said.

The city onboards 28 seasonal lifeguards for full-time and part-time positions in a typical summer to meet requirements.

This season “we have identified candidates, but at last count, we had 24 people in slots,” Yarbrough said.

The city is counting on 25 year-round aquatics employees and qualified part-time workers — it hired 10 water safety instructors but has openings for seven more — to fill the gaps.

“Yesterday, we had a lifeguard call out for illness, and another guard got sick during the day, so we had to close at 6 p.m. because we had no one to pull,” Yarbrough said.

The pools typically close at 8 p.m.

Addressing the issue

For the second year, the city of Charleston offered $200 sign-on bonuses for lifeguards who start and finish the season to encourage applications. It also pays anywhere from $100 to $200 for candidates to complete the training and certification program.

And the wage the city pays 16- to 20-year-old lifeguards is competitive at about $14 an hour.

Yarbrough said the industry is trying to alleviate the nationwide lifeguard shortage, changing the training and certification process and reducing costs by creating a hybrid system allowing for in-pool and computer instruction.

Yet Charleston remains among the other areas nationwide experiencing the shortage that began around COVID when pools didn’t open and couldn’t run instructor-based classes.

“We lost a whole cycle of training,” Yarbrough said. “I suspect this labor shortage won’t go away any time soon, especially in public settings like Charleston, where there are vacancies across the spectrum of summer positions.”

Broader hiring problem

Yarbrough pointed to Charleston’s 40 vacancies in jobs from recreational leaders to food services.

South Carolina’s job market swells in the summer, opening the door to employment for the state’s youngest work-age residents through various seasonal programs.

During the hottest months, employers count on augmenting the workforce to fill jobs at water parks, theme parks, museums and aquariums, said Dan Ellzey, director of the S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce.

There is no better time than summer break for South Carolina youth to gain work experience and learn the soft skills to help them succeed in their future careers.

But this year, these traditional summer employers are reporting fewer applicants for open positions as hiring got underway.

Charleston County Parks had positions open for park attendants, camp counselors, maintenance attendants, administration, recreation program attendants and aides, in addition to the openings for lifeguards and water instructors.

After receiving 695 applications from qualified candidates, only 80 percent of the openings are staffed for the season, said Kristen Watson, human resources coordinator. In previous years, she added, those same positions were typically 100 percent filled.

Fewer candidates applied for summer jobs at Dorchester County parks. They had 28 applicants and hired 15 qualified workers. That left positions open for part-time attendants and operations aides, said Michelle Mills, Dorchester County’s public information officer.

Paul Nunez, director of team development and culture at the South Carolina Aquarium, said, “the application process is in full swing” but added that “filling positions has been a bit challenging over the last couple of years.”

The lack of applicants for summer positions underscores a chronic, broader-based employment issue for the Palmetto State.

“While the overall job market in South Carolina is extremely strong, we have a relatively low labor force participation rate,” said Bryan Grady, DEW’s labor market information director.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 189,000 jobs adjusted for seasonality were open in South Carolina as of March. When seasonal jobs are added to the mix, it poses a challenge this year due to the much-needed demand for help in industries such as leisure and hospitality that were upended over the past two years by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hospitality sector includes a broad category of fields within the service industry, such as lodging, food services, event planning, theme parks, transportation, and other tourism-oriented products and services.

State numbers, adjusted for seasonality, showed an increase of 12,400 jobs added in all sectors from April to May. There were 4,000 jobs added in Leisure and Hospitality, 22,600 more positions than a year earlier.

Employers count on younger workers aged 14 to 21 to help fill positions open during the more active summer tourist season. But the number of most sought after workers aged 16 to 19, isn’t close to peak levels.

In April, Federal Reserve data show nationwide that 36.6 percent of 16-to-19-year-olds participated in the workforce. That was a big increase from the 34.7 percent average between 2010 and 2020 but nowhere near the 51.2 percent average between 1962 and 1980.

State figures are not available.

Researchers at Pew Research Center suggest multiple reasons for a reduction in teen labor force participation: fewer low-skill, entry-level jobs, more schools ending later in June or restarting before Labor Day, more students enrolled in high school or college over the summer, more teens doing volunteer community service, and more students taking unpaid internships, which the Bureau of Labor Statistics doesn’t count as being employed.

Recreational programs are also a factor for potential workers from 14 to 18.

Noah Seguer, 15, of Summerville, said, “I’m too busy with baseball.”

At the end of the day, these types of labor shortages have a big effect on our city and our residents, Yarbrough said.

“These young workers are looking for a job where they can make the most money, a good competitive wage, and a great place to work.”

Yarbrough said the lack of training programs and higher wages in other industries struggling to build a seasonal workforce likely contributed to the lifeguard shortage.

“In our case, we have to train a new generation,” she said.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
This error message is only visible to WordPress admins

Error: No connected account.

Please go to the Instagram Feed settings page to connect an account.

follow us on: