Throw Lumber Jill’s | 4650 Ladson Road | Suite 205 Summerville, SC 29485

Axe throwing in Isle of Palms SC

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The Most Exciting Live Entertainment Game in South Carolina

If you’re looking for an adrenaline-filled, pulse-pounding way to have fun all day, grab an axe and get your throw on at Lumber Jill’s! Axe throwing is the newest, most popular live entertainment game in the Lowcountry. It’s kind of like darts…but with axes! Axe throwing is great for a few hours of amusement, stress relief, team building, and even corporate events in Isle of Palms, SC. Whether you’re looking for a great way to celebrate the weekend or want a new idea for your company event, Lumber Jill’s has got you covered.

The Lumber Jill’s revolution began after co-owners Jill and Heath spent a date night with friends throwing axes in Charleston. After having so much fun, the entrepreneurial couple quickly realized they could create their own take on axe throwing. Soon after, Lumber Jill’s was born!

The name Lumber Jill’s isn’t just a play on our co-owner’s name – it involves a really interesting piece of history too. Across the pond, the Women’s Timber Corps “manned” the lumber yards in England while the men were serving in WWII. They affectionately became known as Lumberjills, Britain’s answer to Rosie the Riveter. Without these brave ladies, Lumber Jill’s wouldn’t exist. We would be remiss if we didn’t salute them for the example they set!

At the end of the day, we want to provide every one of our guests with an outstanding axe-throwing experience. So, grab your friends, co-workers, family, or favorite people and join us for an axe-throwing party you won’t soon forget.

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The Most Exciting Live Entertainment Game in South Carolina

Why is Axe Throwing in Isle of Palms, SC So Popular?

Axes haven’t been this popular in America since “The Shining” hit theaters way back in 1980!

In cities all around the nation, axe-throwing facilities are popping up left and right as a fun, healthy way for people of all ages to congregate and enjoy a night of friendly competition and stress relief. In the last few years, the sport of axe throwing has exploded – so much so that the World Axe Throwing League was assembled in 2017 to coordinate international axe-throwing competitions. Since that time, many axe-throwing events have popped up on national TV stations like ESPN.

Axe Throwing
But why is axe throwing so popular? Here are just a few reasons why Lumber Jill’s and axe throwing as a whole is a hit in South Carolina:
stress-relief
Stress Relief

Perhaps the most popular reason folks love axe throwing in Isle of Palms is for stress relief. We’ve even heard some customers say it’s a cheaper form of therapy! In reality, axe tossing gives you a therapeutic release that is hard to replicate. A few hard throws with an axe and your body releases a flood of endorphins, which help increase your energy, improve your mood, and facilitate healthy blood flow. If you have pent-up anger, nothing feels better than chucking a heavy axe at a target. Hitting a bullseye is even better!

exercise
Exercise

Since axe throwing is such an exhilarating activity, many people don’t realize that they are exercising their arms, legs, abs, pecs, and even back when they come to Lumber Jill’s. Like high-intensity interval training (HIIT) workouts, axe throwing works several muscle groups at once. These exercises strengthen your core and help define your muscles. When coupled with a healthy diet, regular axe-throwing activities can even help you shed a few pounds.

Corporate Comradery
Corporate Comradery

You might be surprised to hear that axe throwing is one of the most sought-after company event ideas in Isle of Palms, SC. Sure, your colleagues might think it’s a little weird to host a corporate meeting at an axe-throwing facility. But once your co-worker hits their target, they’ll quickly understand how much fun they can have. Perhaps more importantly, axe tossing is a safe, fun way to conduct trust exercises and build team morale overall.

Unique Way to Have Fun
Unique Way to Have Fun

When you get right down to it, axe throwing is good, clean, healthy fun. Axe throwing helps relieve shoulder tension, while laughing helps engage your body’s core. When you throw in an adult beverage or two, laughs become easier and fun flows more freely. You can’t help but have the time of your life at Lumber Jill’s in the Lowcountry.

Family Fun
Family Fun

Axe throwing isn’t reserved only for adults – kids can get in on the fun and excitement too. Our warm, inviting atmosphere inspires people to embrace their inner champion, even if they’re under 18. At Lumber Jill’s, we can accommodate kids ages 10 and up. Before we pass them an axe, we will evaluate their skill level to ensure their safety. Contact us today for more info on birthday celebrations and whole facility rentals.

Friday is Family Fun Night

$80 for Family of Four

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At Your Next Corporate Event

Status quote, average, ordinary…these are qualities that no employer would want out of their employees. So, why host a team-building event at a venue with the same characteristics?

If you’re on the hunt for corporate event venues in Isle of Palms, SC, you just hit the jackpot. We may be a little biased, but Lumber Jill’s is a fantastic corporate event venue for companies looking to try something new.

Axe throwing for corporate events is fun, high-energy, and safe for all your employees. We’re talking an adrenaline-filled day with your own private axe-throwing lanes. Get your clients or your team out of the office and give them something to be excited about!

Here are just a few reasons to reserve our facility for your company get together:

Bury the Hatchet at Your Next Corporate Event
  • No Suit or Tie Required: Feel like taking a casual day? No judgments here! The only thing that matters is that you hit your target (or try your best to do so).
  • No Rain Delays: Unlike some outdoor venues, Lumber Jill’s won’t delay or cancel your event if it starts raining outside. We’re here to make your corporate event more fun, rain or shine.
  • Skill Not Required: Never thrown an axe in your life? Have poor hand-to-eye coordination? Don’t sweat it. Our coaches are know how to teach first-timers the positions and techniques they need to have a blast.
  • Large Groups Welcome: Do you have 20 or more people confirmed for your corporate event? We can make room for your whole team! Give us a shout and let us know about your upcoming event. That way, we can block off your desired day so you can have our entire facility to yourself.
  • Safety First: We take safety very seriously at Lumber Jill’s. As such, we have implemented several safety rules to protect your team and ensure they have the best time possible.

Birthdays, Celebrations, and Reunions, Oh My!

In addition to our standard reservations, we are happy to offer celebration, corporate, and full facility rental packages. Planning a surprise birthday party for your best friend? Celebrating a life event with that special someone? Looking for a spot for your family reunion? Axe throwing in Isle of Palms, SC is the perfect activity for your group! For the most memorable (or hazy) celebration, don’t forget to ask us about alcoholic beverage service and additional lane time.

If you want to spice up your next birthday party or take your bachelorette party to the next level, our celebration package is the perfect fit. This package includes:
  • 2 lanes
  • 1 designated coach
  • 1.5 hours of axe throwing
  • Free shirt for a special guest
  • Table coverings
  • 1 drink for each guest
  • 12 axe throwers
  • 45 total minutes of throwing time
Birthdays, Celebrations, and Reunions, Oh My!

Please note that our celebration package is designed for customers over the age of 12. Two adults must be present at all times.

Common Questions. Helpful Answers.

We understand that axe throwing isn’t your typical date night or even guy’s night activity. We get it – you’re hurling real axes at a target that is only a few feet away. On the surface, that can sound a little scary. But don’t worry, many of our first-time guests have questions about how our process works too.

This is a great question and one that we receive quite often (crazy, right?). Axe throwing at Lumber Jill’s is absolutely safe. In fact, safety is our #1 priority and has been since day one. Our knowledgeable axe-throwing coaches are trained to keep a keen eye on every axe thrower, whether they’re solo or with a group. If, for ANY REASON our coaches feel like a person shouldn’t throw an axe, they will not be permitted to do so. To help keep our facility safe, please refrain from bringing your own axe to Lumber Jill’s. The same goes for any other kind of throwable object.
The easiest, fastest way to book your axe-throwing lane is to make your reservation online. Walk-ins are welcomed, but we cannot guarantee that we will have a spot open for you or your party. For inquiries about corporate events, facility rentals, or large celebrations, please contact us directly at (843)-879-3030.
We suggest you wear something that you find comfy and easy to wear for a few hours. Don’t wear anything that will restrict your movement. The biggest “no-no” we have in terms of dress code is open-toed shoes, which are not allowed. If you pop in for a last-minute axe-throwing session, and need a pair of shoes, don’t fret. We offer shoe rentals for $3 per person.
Unfortunately, we are not permitted to allow outside axes at Lumber Jill’s. The same goes for any other object like throwing stars or throwing knives. We’ve got all you need to have the time of your life, including throwing axes.
Yes, absolutely. We are proud to have a wide selection of alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks to keep you cool and hydrated. If you’re feeling hangry, don’t worry. We have plenty of tasty snacks to munch on if your tummy starts to rumble.

Axe of Kindness

One of the best parts of owning Lumber Jill’s is our ability to give back to our local community. We are always on the hunt for new, inventive ways to serve our citizens. That’s why, once a month, we host Axe of Kindness night to shine a light on an important organization, charity, or good cause. These exciting events give our customers a compelling way to make a real difference in someone’s life.

If you have a donation request or are interested in hosting a fundraiser with Lumber Jill’s, send us your info at

aok@throwlumberjills.com.

Latest News in Isle of Palms

Isle of Palms now has more free beach parking instead of less

ISLE OF PALMS — On a barrier island that months ago planned to eliminate 200 beach parking spots, the state Department of Transportation has asserted its authority and instead increased the amount of free parking.Described as a win-win solution by Isle of Palms’ mayor because other city parking restrictions will remain, the hard-fought compromise ends months of dispute over where cars can go at one of the Charleston area’s most popular beaches.“The issue of parking and beach access is greater than the Is...

ISLE OF PALMS — On a barrier island that months ago planned to eliminate 200 beach parking spots, the state Department of Transportation has asserted its authority and instead increased the amount of free parking.

Described as a win-win solution by Isle of Palms’ mayor because other city parking restrictions will remain, the hard-fought compromise ends months of dispute over where cars can go at one of the Charleston area’s most popular beaches.

“The issue of parking and beach access is greater than the Isle of Palms and affects the state as a whole,” DOT Secretary Christy Hall said in joining the mayor and city officials to discuss the work April 19.

They talked as highway department crews laid out more than 200 angled parking spots along one side of Palm Boulevard, a state-owned road closest to the beach.

Hall also announced that the speed limit on Palm Boulevard will be reduced to 30 mph, down from 35.

Opinions on the island were mixed.

“Stupidity!” yelled a man on a bike, riding past as Hall, Mayor Jimmy Carroll and others explained the plan to reporters on Palm Boulevard near 27th Avenue.

Resident Tamara Burrell, who was walking a dog on 27th Avenue, said the plan is a good compromise because parking on residential side streets like 27th will remain limited to residents.

“We’ve gone from no parking, to some parking, to more parking,” she said, giving a shorthand summary of the back-and-forth over what to do with the summer influx of cars that began to increase in rhetoric in 2020.

In 2020, the island restricted nonresident parking in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Then, later in the year, officials announced plans to permanently reduce parking near the beach and charge for what remained.

It all came to a head in September when the Isle of Palms City Council approved a plan to eliminate about 200 parking spaces near the beach.

For the DOT, which has authority over parking along state-owned roads, the barrier island had pushed the issue too far.

Hall immediately rejected the plan to eliminate parking and in February threatened to revoke approval of the city’s entire 2015 parking plan.

“We were getting ready to go into a battle with them revoking our parking plan,” Carroll said. “Luckily, at the last minute, both Secretary Hall and Administrator (Desiree) Fragoso worked well together.”

The compromise that appears to have now ended the dispute adds more free parking along Palm Boulevard by installing angled parking where only parallel parking had existed. All the angled spaces are on the land side of the road where there’s a large right-of-way, while the beach side of the road will continue to have parallel parking.

“This is going to be so much better,” said Carroll. “It’s going to be organized parking on Palm Boulevard.” He added, “it increases parking on Palm Boulevard, but protects the neighborhoods and our parking plan. It’s a win-win for everybody.”

Police Chief Kevin Cornett said the new layout should improve public safety because it leaves a large shoulder area between the parking spots and Palm Boulevard.

State workers were still laying out the spaces late on April 19 but the final result is expected to be between 220 and 260 parking spots where there used to be 190, Hall said.

No palmetto trees were removed as part of the plan.

City Councilman Randy Bell said Isle of Palms had worked with DOT on the dimensions of the parking spots to assure they are large enough to handle even generously sized pickup trucks, while allowing 12 feet between the road and the back of the parked cars.

“The city’s goal is safe parking, not to keep people out of here,” he said.

That’s not the perception thousands of people had in 2020 when the city talked about eliminating parking and charging for what remained. Aggrieved residents of Mount Pleasant formed a Facebook group that later became an organized nonprofit, which filed suit against the city.

With the parking dispute seemingly resolved, Isle of Palms and DOT are still in disagreement over recent changes to the Isle of Palms Connector, the main bridge to the island. DOT recently added bicycle and pedestrian lanes to the causeway at the expense of a center lane reserved for emergency vehicles.

Both the city and SCDOT plan to conduct traffic studies to evaluate the results.

SC might make beaches provide free parking. Isle of Palms begs McMaster to veto bill

In a move that puts a South Carolina beach community at odds with both its neighbors and the state legislature, Isle of Palms voted Friday to oppose a state bill that would require free and unrestricted beach parking along state highways.The city’s resolution, which passed 7-0 during a special City Council meeting, carries no weight of law, but it does express the city’s di...

In a move that puts a South Carolina beach community at odds with both its neighbors and the state legislature, Isle of Palms voted Friday to oppose a state bill that would require free and unrestricted beach parking along state highways.

The city’s resolution, which passed 7-0 during a special City Council meeting, carries no weight of law, but it does express the city’s disapproval of a bill introduced by state Sen. Larry Grooms, R-Berkeley.

The legislation would require South Carolina’s beach communities to provide at least some free parking on state roads.

It also would give towns the authority to include paid public beach parking and to use those funds to maintain, operate and preserve things like beach parking facilities; beach access, maintenance, and renourishment; traffic and parking enforcement; first responders; sanitation; and litter control and removal.

The Isle of Palms council meeting Friday morning took all of 3 minutes and 12 seconds. Two council members, Ryan Buchannon and Phillip Pounds, did not attend.

Mayor Jimmy Carroll, reading from the resolution, said the goal was to express the city’s opposition to the implementation of the legislation “by all lawful means necessary.”

It also urges S.C. Gov. Henry McMaster to veto the bill when it gets to his desk.

The resolution also claims the legislation “clearly discloses that barrier island communities, including the Isle of Palms, are being singled out and treated differently from other municipal entities in this state in a politically motivated, unconstitutional response to the City’s actions taken in the interest of public health and safety.”

It continues, alleging the bill “violates The Home Rule Act, which explicitly gives municipalities the sole power to control roads and streets within the municipality for the public health.”

“Home rule has always been a fundamental part of why South Carolina is so wonderful,” Councilman John Moye said in an emailed statement following the vote. “When home rule is threatened at this scale, issues that local leaders and communities know how to best address are suddenly being managed by politicians in Columbia.”

Isle of Palms, which is located across the Intracoastal Waterway from Mount Pleasant, has become the nexus of South Carolina’s beach parking drama. The back-and-forth over free versus paid parking has sparked debates over who deserves access to state’s public sands.

The debate intensified last year when South Carolina closed public access to its beaches, all of which the state owns, at the start of the pandemic in an attempt to slow the spread of COVID-19. After McMaster reopened the beaches in late April, Isle of Palms, Sullivan’s Island and Folly Beach took a more gradual approach, issuing their own emergency orders to restrict public beach access and reduce the number of nonresidents coming in at the time.

Isle of Palms is facing a lawsuit over its 2020 decision to temporarily block nonresidents from using more than 750 parking spots near the beach, leaving just 10 free spaces for visitors.

All beaches are now open to the public.

Recently, ahead of the busy summer tourist season, the S.C. Department of Transportation installed approximately 240 angled spaces on the land side of the state-owned Palm Boulevard, stretching from 22nd to 40th Ave.

State Rep. Joe Bustos, R-Charleston, argued on the House floor last week that the bill was not ready for a vote and urged further debate.

“This is not a beach access bill. This is a beach parking bill, and we need to understand that,” Bustos said.

His attempts to table the bill were unsuccessful.

The local resolution that passed Friday now puts Isle of Palms at odds with Mount Pleasant, a neighboring town that in January passed a resolution to show public support for Grooms’ bill.

The bill, S. 40, passed its final reading May 13 in a 102-10 vote in the state House. It now heads to McMaster’s desk.

It is still unclear whether McMaster will sign the bill into law.

“Governor McMaster is still in the process of reviewing the bill and greatly appreciates all input,” said Brandon Charochak, a spokesman for the governor. “He will make a final decision in the coming days.”

Memorial Day weekend, considered the unofficial start of the summer tourist season, is next week.

A group calling themselves the Barrier Island Preservation Alliance welcomed the move by Isle of Palms on Friday.

The group’s stated mission is to foster dialogue and community engagement to address the unique challenges of barrier island beaches.

Morgan Harris, an Isle of Palms resident and member of the alliance, said council members share their goals.

“They, like we, want Isle of Palms to continue to be an open and welcoming community that is safe for families, businesses and visitors alike. And they believe, as so many of us do, that we, rather than Columbia bureaucrats and politicians, are best equipped to make decisions about parking in Isle of Palms,” Harris said.

This story was originally published May 21, 2021 2:12 PM.

20 years in the making, long-envisioned Magnolia project to see initial development in ’22

The first signs of development could soon blossom to reclaim a large contaminated industrial site on Charleston’s upper peninsula, nearly two decades after the process began.Highland Resources is expected to begin construction on the first phase of roads and underground utilities by the spring in the long-anticipated Magnolia project.The Houston-based developer completed the purchase of the 190-acre site in 2018 for $52 million through a bankruptcy auction after the previous owners faltered in the aftermath of the crippli...

The first signs of development could soon blossom to reclaim a large contaminated industrial site on Charleston’s upper peninsula, nearly two decades after the process began.

Highland Resources is expected to begin construction on the first phase of roads and underground utilities by the spring in the long-anticipated Magnolia project.

The Houston-based developer completed the purchase of the 190-acre site in 2018 for $52 million through a bankruptcy auction after the previous owners faltered in the aftermath of the crippling recession in 2008.

Highland invested another $35 million in environmental remediation that included laying down a fabric-like barrier and adding at least another foot of dirt on top of it.

“We remediated a lot of the contaminated soil, put down the barrier and added 1.6 million cubic feet of clean fill dirt,” Highland Resources CEO Clark Davis said.

The remediation work is the unsexy part of the project, Magnolia spokesman Jonathan Scott said.

“Once you see streets and sidewalks, it becomes apparent they are starting to build out this property,” he added.

The site, with much of it marsh, features 81 developable acres. The project will be divided into three phases with buildout over more than 15 years.

Street talk

The first 20-acre development project will include office, retail and apartments on the south end of the Magnolia site near an $8 million bridge built in 2010 as a connection from Heriot Street.

It has long been dubbed the “Bridge to Nowhere,” a label frowned upon by the developer. The first phase of vertical construction, set to begin in 2023 and two decades in the making, could undo the infamous moniker.

The 1,400-foot-long span is open to pedestrians but closed to vehicular traffic.

The second and third phases will include a mix of uses on the rest of the property, with plans for waterfront offices and possibly a hotel near the Ashley River.

A storm drain has been installed down the center of the site leading to the river.

“It’s large enough to put a small SUV through,” Davis said.

The site has been approved for 4,080 housing units, 1.05 million square feet of office space, 200,000 square feet of retail space and 1,040 hotel rooms.

At full buildout, Magnolia will add more than 10,000 residents to Charleston, already the largest city in South Carolina. At least 15 percent of the housing will be set aside as workforce units.

Building heights will range from three to nine stories with the tallest buildings concentrated in the middle of the development and five stories near the marsh.

The plan sets aside 24 acres of public parks, and it preserves more than 49 acres of marsh.

Most of the usable open space will be along the waterfront, creating a continuous park that will stretch into the marsh and include at least two public access points. The plan also includes neighborhood greens, parks, plazas and public squares as well as entertainment venues.

Construction on a waterfront park will occur along with development of the first 20 acres, Scott said.

Once one phase is completed, work on the next one will begin within 18-24 months under the current development plan, Davis said.

“We have a lot of interest from people who want to build out here,” Davis said. “We want something top quality and generational. … We are trying to find one master developer to come in and work on the project.”

The Highland CEO also pointed out the company has made its investment in the project for the long haul.

“We really believe in the project and intend to make a long-term commitment,” Davis said.

One tenant remains on the site. Parker Marine sits on the waterfront but is expected to vacate the property by the end of 2022.

History of contamination

Decades ago, the site was a heavy-industrial zone that housed fertilizer factories, a lumber-treatment plant and other businesses. Those former tenants left behind a legacy of lead, arsenic, creosote and other contaminants in the soil.

The first reuse plan began to emerge about 20 years ago. Led by Raleigh-based Cherokee Investment Partners, the Magnolia backers set out to scrub the dirt clean so it could be built upon, describing the big infill project as the largest redevelopment of polluted land in South Carolina.

The original investors formed two companies, Ashley I and Ashley II, which began buying up property in 2002. Over time, they closed 33 deals and amassed nearly 200 contiguous acres around Braswell and Milford streets. Their master plan called for a small city to rise from the former industrial wasteland.

But the ambitious deal faltered and never regained its footing. Hobbled by the 2008 downturn, cleanup expenses and litigation costs, Ashley I and Ashley II filed for bankruptcy in 2016, listing debts of more than $23 million. They also disclosed they had invested nearly $50 million in the Magnolia deal.

When Highland prevailed as the winning bidder, its then-CEO said the privately held firm cited years of experience dealing with contaminated real estate and successfully working with environmental regulators.

More than half of the land the company acquired was so contaminated that it was designated a federal “Superfund” site in 1994 by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Paperwork has now been filed to have that portion of the site taken off the EPA’s “National Priority List” in September.

South Carolina Professional Firefighter Association raises concern about low IOP pay

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCIV) — The South Carolina Professional Firefighters Association said the wages for the Isle of Palm Fire Department are not high enough.Th...

ISLE OF PALMS, S.C. (WCIV) — The South Carolina Professional Firefighters Association said the wages for the Isle of Palm Fire Department are not high enough.

The city of Isle of Palms said the lowest paid firefighter earns $12.55 an hour.

"They are not paying well. And they are not paying down the road, people are realizing it," said William Pesature, Vice President of the SC Professional Firefighter Association.

Pesature said in the firefighting world you want to build a team that has experience, training and standing.

He said the Isle of Palms is not doing that for their firefighters and a change needs to be made when it comes to pay.

He said the department has two problems: no fire chief for the last eight months and the firefighter pay rate.

"You should be able to afford a decent wage for your firefighters so that they want to stay there. If you have one of the richest cities in the state, and you are not taking care of your first responders? What's going to happen to your in an emergency situation?" he said.

Pesature said the issue should concern taxpayers on the island because when someone leaves the department the city has to pay to train a new employee.

"Training is very expensive. Because they have to pay for a person to go to school and then when they are supposed to be in the fire house (and) they have to pay someone overtime to cover their spot to maintain the standards of staffing," he said.

Read More: New signs going up at Johns Island bus stop to remind drivers to stop for school buses

ABC News 4 reached out to the city for comment. Desiree Farago, the city administrator said in part, "The City is in the process of finalizing a wage and compensation analysis with the goal of identifying market based and competitive wages for all City positions. We expect the report and recommendations for adjustments will be in place before the end of the year."

"We have also collected feedback from every member of the fire department regarding how we reward high performance and increase wages throughout their tenure with the city that will be incorporated into new compensation policies," John Moye, an IOP councilman, said.

Moye said the consultant's leading the wage compensation plan should be presenting to council sometime in September.

CARTA’s summer beach shuttle from Mount Pleasant to Isle of Palms will be free

MOUNT PLEASANT — A summer weekend shuttle bus from Mount Pleasant to the Isle of Palms beachfront will start running May 29, and thanks to just-announced funding from the two municipalities it will be free to ride. CARTA will run a free weekend beach shuttle, May 9 to Sept. 6, from Market Center Boulevard in Towne Centre to the 9th Avenue beach access on the island. SOURCE: ESRI | BRANDON LOCKETT | THE POST AND COURIER The shuttle will run hourly on Saturdays and Sundays through Sept. 6 from a stop...

MOUNT PLEASANT — A summer weekend shuttle bus from Mount Pleasant to the Isle of Palms beachfront will start running May 29, and thanks to just-announced funding from the two municipalities it will be free to ride.

The shuttle will run hourly on Saturdays and Sundays through Sept. 6 from a stop at the Towne Centre shopping area in Mount Pleasant to the Isle of Palms beach access at Ocean Boulevard and 9th Avenue.

The shuttle will also run on Memorial Day and on Labor Day.

“With this service in place for the season, access to the ocean has never been greater for residents of the region,” said Mike Seekings, chairman of CARTA’s board.

When the Charleston Area Regional Transportation Authority originally announced updated plans for the shuttle May 19, the short trip from Towne Centre to the Isle of Palms beach was going to cost riders $4 round-trip.

That’s because IOP at that time hadn’t committed to contribute funding.

“To date, the City of Isle of Palms has declined to contribute any funding to the Beach Reach shuttle service, which the city requested,” CARTA spokesman Daniel Brock said.

The transit advocacy group Best Friends of Lowcountry Transit also criticized the lack of financial support from Isle of Palms needed to make the shuttle free for riders.

But the following morning, May 20, Isle of Palms agreed to contribute $8,000 toward the cost of the shuttle — matching an equal contribution from Mount Pleasant — and CARTA said the shuttle would be free.

“We’ll definitely match Mount Pleasant’s because we want this to be successful,” said IOP Administrator Desiree Fragoso. “It’s something the city has been advocating and we’re happy that people are embracing different modes of transportation.”

She said the funding issue had been a miscommunication.

The summer shuttle will cost an estimated $24,000 to run, with CARTA, Mount Pleasant and Isle of Palms each paying $8,000.

CARTA did a test-run of the beach shuttle in the fall. It was prompted, in part, by Isle of Palms’ plan to eliminate much of the free parking at the beach — a plan that was later quashed by the S.C. Department of Transportation.

Brock said that although there’s more free parking at the beach than expected, the Beach Reach shuttle still serves an important need by increasing access to the beach for the area’s growing population.

William Hamilton, executive director of Best Friends of Lowcountry Transit, said the connection will allow some area residents to visit the beach for the first time. The shuttle will be coordinated with the existing Route 40 and Route 42 buses.

“Before this summer is over, we’ll be taking families with children to the beach on this bus who have never seen the ocean,” he said.

Hamilton noted that the bus stop on Isle of Palms has no seating or shade, and said he hopes the city will work on that.

Fragoso said the city will “be looking at what can be done to address that.”

The 9th Avenue beach access is two blocks south of the island’s beachfront commercial area, where there are shops, restrooms and beach showers.

The hourly shuttle will depart Towne Centre, from a stop on Market Center Boulevard near the Belk Men’s store starting at 9:15 a.m. The last return bus from Isle of Palms will leave at 5:35 p.m.

Riders will need to wear masks, shoes, shirt and pants, or beach cover-ups. Coolers will be allowed, but not bulky items such as surfboards or large beach umbrellas.

Route details and bus tracking will be available on the free Transit App, which can be downloaded from Apple’s App Store or Google Play.

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This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
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