Throw Lumber Jill’s | 4650 Ladson Road | Suite 205 Summerville, SC 29485

Axe throwing in James Island SC

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The Most Exciting Live Entertainment Game in South Carolina

If you're looking for an adrenaline-filled, pulse-pounding way to have fun all day, grab an axe and get your throw on at Lumber Jill's! Axe throwing is the newest, most popular live entertainment game in the Lowcountry. It's kind of like darts...but with axes! Axe throwing is great for a few hours of amusement, stress relief, team building, and even corporate events in James Island, SC. Whether you're looking for a great way to celebrate the weekend or want a new idea for your company event, Lumber Jill's has got you covered.

The Lumber Jill's revolution began after co-owners Jill and Heath spent a date night with friends throwing axes in Charleston. After having so much fun, the entrepreneurial couple quickly realized they could create their own take on axe throwing. Soon after, Lumber Jill's was born!

The name Lumber Jill's isn't just a play on our co-owner's name - it involves a really interesting piece of history too. Across the pond, the Women's Timber Corps "manned" the lumber yards in England while the men were serving in WWII. They affectionately became known as Lumberjills, Britain's answer to Rosie the Riveter. Without these brave ladies, Lumber Jill's wouldn't exist. We would be remiss if we didn't salute them for the example they set!

At the end of the day, we want to provide every one of our guests with an outstanding axe-throwing experience. So, grab your friends, co-workers, family, or favorite people and join us for an axe-throwing party you won't soon forget.

Service Area

Axe Throwing Leagues James Island, SC

Why is Axe Throwing in James Island, SC So Popular?

Axes haven't been this popular in America since "The Shining" hit theaters way back in 1980!

In cities all around the nation, axe-throwing facilities are popping up left and right as a fun, healthy way for people of all ages to congregate and enjoy a night of friendly competition and stress relief. In the last few years, the sport of axe throwing has exploded - so much so that the World Axe Throwing League was assembled in 2017 to coordinate international axe-throwing competitions. Since that time, many axe-throwing events have popped up on national TV stations like ESPN.

 Axe Throwing James Island, SC
But why is axe throwing so popular? Here are just a few reasons why Lumber Jill's and axe throwing as a whole is a hit in South Carolina:
stress-relief
Stress Relief

Perhaps the most popular reason folks love axe throwing in James Island is for stress relief. We've even heard some customers say it's a cheaper form of therapy! In reality, axe tossing gives you a therapeutic release that is hard to replicate. A few hard throws with an axe and your body releases a flood of endorphins, which help increase your energy, improve your mood, and facilitate healthy blood flow. If you have pent-up anger, nothing feels better than chucking a heavy axe at a target. Hitting a bullseye is even better!

exercise
Exercise

Since axe throwing is such an exhilarating activity, many people don't realize that they are exercising their arms, legs, abs, pecs, and even back when they come to Lumber Jill's. Like high-intensity interval training (HIIT) workouts, axe throwing works several muscle groups at once. These exercises strengthen your core and help define your muscles. When coupled with a healthy diet, regular axe-throwing activities can even help you shed a few pounds.

Corporate Comradery
Corporate Comradery

You might be surprised to hear that axe throwing is one of the most sought-after company event ideas in James Island, SC. Sure, your colleagues might think it's a little weird to host a corporate meeting at an axe-throwing facility. But once your co-worker hits their target, they'll quickly understand how much fun they can have. Perhaps more importantly, axe tossing is a safe, fun way to conduct trust exercises and build team morale overall.

Unique Way to Have Fun
Unique Way to Have Fun

When you get right down to it, axe throwing is good, clean, healthy fun. Axe throwing helps relieve shoulder tension, while laughing helps engage your body's core. When you throw in an adult beverage or two, laughs become easier and fun flows more freely. You can't help but have the time of your life at Lumber Jill's in the Lowcountry.

Family Fun
Family Fun

Axe throwing isn't reserved only for adults - kids can get in on the fun and excitement too. Our warm, inviting atmosphere inspires people to embrace their inner champion, even if they're under 18. At Lumber Jill's, we can accommodate kids ages 10 and up. Before we pass them an axe, we will evaluate their skill level to ensure their safety. Contact us today for more info on birthday celebrations and whole facility rentals.

At Your Next Corporate Event

Status quote, average, ordinary...these are qualities that no employer would want out of their employees. So, why host a team-building event at a venue with the same characteristics?

If you're on the hunt for corporate event venues in James Island, SC, you just hit the jackpot. We may be a little biased, but Lumber Jill's is a fantastic corporate event venue for companies looking to try something new.

Axe throwing for corporate events is fun, high-energy, and safe for all your employees. We're talking an adrenaline-filled day with your own private axe-throwing lanes. Get your clients or your team out of the office and give them something to be excited about!

Here are just a few reasons to reserve our facility for your company get together:

 Axe Throwing Center James Island, SC
  • No Suit or Tie Required: Feel like taking a casual day? No judgments here! The only thing that matters is that you hit your target (or try your best to do so).
  • No Rain Delays: Unlike some outdoor venues, Lumber Jill's won't delay or cancel your event if it starts raining outside. We're here to make your corporate event more fun, rain or shine.
  • Skill Not Required: Never thrown an axe in your life? Have poor hand-to-eye coordination? Don't sweat it. Our coaches are know how to teach first-timers the positions and techniques they need to have a blast.
  • Large Groups Welcome: Do you have 20 or more people confirmed for your corporate event? We can make room for your whole team! Give us a shout and let us know about your upcoming event. That way, we can block off your desired day so you can have our entire facility to yourself.
  • Safety First: We take safety very seriously at Lumber Jill's. As such, we have implemented several safety rules to protect your team and ensure they have the best time possible.

Birthdays, Celebrations, and Reunions, Oh My!

In addition to our standard reservations, we are happy to offer celebration, corporate, and full facility rental packages. Planning a surprise birthday party for your best friend? Celebrating a life event with that special someone? Looking for a spot for your family reunion? Axe throwing in James Island, SC is the perfect activity for your group! For the most memorable (or hazy) celebration, don't forget to ask us about alcoholic beverage service and additional lane time.

If you want to spice up your next birthday party or take your bachelorette party to the next level, our celebration package is the perfect fit. This package includes:
  • 2 lanes
  • 1 designated coach
  • 1.5 hours of axe throwing
  • Free shirt for a special guest
  • Table coverings
  • 1 drink for each guest
  • 12 axe throwers
  • 45 total minutes of throwing time
 Axe Throwing Location James Island, SC

Please note that our celebration package is designed for customers over the age of 12. Two adults must be present at all times.

Common Questions. Helpful Answers.

We understand that axe throwing isn't your typical date night or even guy's night activity. We get it - you're hurling real axes at a target that is only a few feet away. On the surface, that can sound a little scary. But don't worry, many of our first-time guests have questions about how our process works too.

This is a great question and one that we receive quite often (crazy, right?). Axe throwing at Lumber Jill's is absolutely safe. In fact, safety is our #1 priority and has been since day one. Our knowledgeable axe-throwing coaches are trained to keep a keen eye on every axe thrower, whether they're solo or with a group. If, for ANY REASON our coaches feel like a person shouldn't throw an axe, they will not be permitted to do so. To help keep our facility safe, please refrain from bringing your own axe to Lumber Jill's. The same goes for any other kind of throwable object.
The easiest, fastest way to book your axe-throwing lane is to make your reservation online. Walk-ins are welcomed, but we cannot guarantee that we will have a spot open for you or your party. For inquiries about corporate events, facility rentals, or large celebrations, please contact us directly at (843)-879-3030.
We suggest you wear something that you find comfy and easy to wear for a few hours. Don't wear anything that will restrict your movement. The biggest "no-no" we have in terms of dress code is open-toed shoes, which are not allowed. If you pop in for a last-minute axe-throwing session, and need a pair of shoes, don't fret. We offer shoe rentals for $3 per person.
Unfortunately, we are not permitted to allow outside axes at Lumber Jill's. The same goes for any other object like throwing stars or throwing knives. We've got all you need to have the time of your life, including throwing axes.
Yes, absolutely. We are proud to have a wide selection of alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks to keep you cool and hydrated. If you're feeling hangry, don't worry. We have plenty of tasty snacks to munch on if your tummy starts to rumble.

Axe of Kindness

One of the best parts of owning Lumber Jill's is our ability to give back to our local community. We are always on the hunt for new, inventive ways to serve our citizens. That's why, once a month, we host Axe of Kindness night to shine a light on an important organization, charity, or good cause. These exciting events give our customers a compelling way to make a real difference in someone's life.

If you have a donation request or are interested in hosting a fundraiser with Lumber Jill's, send us your info at

aok@throwlumberjills.com.

Latest News in James Island, SC

Lifeguard shortage reaches Splash Island waterpark

Splash Island waterpark in Mount Pleasant will only be open for four days a week this summer due to a lifeguard shortage at Charleston County Parks.The waterpark will be operating on a modified schedule beginning June 8. The park will be open Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Cyclone, a spinning water ride, will also be closed for the season unless enough lifeguards are hired to operate it.Park admission for Splash Island will be reduced from $9.99 to $7.99 to reflect the ride closure.The decision to ...

Splash Island waterpark in Mount Pleasant will only be open for four days a week this summer due to a lifeguard shortage at Charleston County Parks.

The waterpark will be operating on a modified schedule beginning June 8. The park will be open Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Cyclone, a spinning water ride, will also be closed for the season unless enough lifeguards are hired to operate it.

Park admission for Splash Island will be reduced from $9.99 to $7.99 to reflect the ride closure.

The decision to close the waterpark on certain days was made to adhere to safety standards set forth by the Starfish Aquatics Institute, which requires a certain number of lifeguards on duty at every attraction.

During a fully-staffed season, Splash Island has 35 lifeguards. If all attractions at the waterpark are open, it takes nearly 10 lifeguards to run the facility.

This season, the waterpark employs only 15 fully trained and working lifeguards. However, Sarah Reynolds, the public information coordinator for CCP, said that the staffing issue could resolve itself soon.

“In the last couple of weeks, we’ve had a great response from the community as far as recruitment. We currently have around 30 lifeguards that are going through our training process for all of our waterparks,” Reynolds said. “It’s possible that our shortage could possibly remedy itself, but it’s really just going to depend on how everything works out. So it’s possible that our closures at Splash Island could change for the better.”

Recruiting efforts for the summer season included going to school job fairs, sending schools marketing materials and attending community events to promote internal job boards. Wages for lifeguards recently increased from $11.50 per hour to $14 per hour.

“We raised our wages fairly considerably. We pay entirely for our lifeguard’s uniforms and all of their training. We’re offering all those different perks and really getting out there and just letting everybody know that we need more lifeguards,” said Safety Program Manager for CCP Nikki Bowie.

Despite these increased recruiting efforts, CCP was unable to hire enough guards by the start of the season to fully operate all three waterparks. CCP will continue hiring lifeguards until the end of June. As more guards become available, CCP hopes to remain open for more days in the week. Reynolds said the county parks will prioritize opening more days during the week than opening closed attractions.

CCP employs roughly 200 lifeguards across three waterparks. Whirlin’ Waters in North Charleston is fully staffed and will operate as usual this summer. Splash Zone in James Island will also operate on a modified schedule starting on June 8, open Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

The lifeguard shortage extends to Charleston County beaches as well, Bowie said. In response to the shortage, the guarded area at the Folly Beach pier will be smaller this season.

For information on job openings or to apply, visit ccprc.com/jobs. For additional information about Charleston County Parks’ waterparks, visit CharlestonCountyParks.com.

SC closes on nuns’ James Island waterfront property for $23M with plans to make a park

JAMES ISLAND — The sale is complete for a piece of waterfront property between a suburban subdivision and a collection of marine labs, and there’s high hopes the state could turn the property into a centerpiece park.In June, a group of lawmakers announced they intended to bid on a 23-acre property at the end of Fort Johnson Road inhabited by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy. The congregation of nuns dates back nearly two centuries in Charleston.The announcement was ...

JAMES ISLAND — The sale is complete for a piece of waterfront property between a suburban subdivision and a collection of marine labs, and there’s high hopes the state could turn the property into a centerpiece park.

In June, a group of lawmakers announced they intended to bid on a 23-acre property at the end of Fort Johnson Road inhabited by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy. The congregation of nuns dates back nearly two centuries in Charleston.

The announcement was a surprise at the time.

State Sen. Chip Campsen, R-Isle of Palms, told The Post and Courier in an interview this week that lawmakers only noticed the property was for sale as the window to bid was rapidly closing, and that the state’s formal offer came after that period had ended.

The state’s offer was not the highest, but it was successful, Campsen said, in part because it came without conditions that a developer might attach — like not closing until building permits are awarded.

Property records indicate the sale closed at the end of July, and the final price was $23.25 million.

The opportunity to preserve the 23-acre waterfront parcel from development, complete with views of Fort Sumter and the rest of Charleston Harbor, was a rare one, Campsen said.

He said the sisters “felt like their legacy and their stewardship of that land would be best protected, best preserved for future generations if the state bought it.”

The property will be owned by the Department of Natural Resources, which runs the marine lab next door, and managed by the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism, which might one day rent out the convent building on the site.

Campsen said the 24 rooms would probably have to be expanded for future visitors.

Sam Queen, a spokeswoman for PRT, said that a public planning process for the site is expected to begin early next year.

“It definitely is a unique situation and one we’re excited about,” she said.

DNR, meanwhile, had already been doing some work near the site, cooperating with the sisters there to use oyster reefs to stabilize erosion on the waterfront, said Erin Weeks, an agency spokeswoman. Most of the parcel is forested, with a residence building and a chapel on site.

Campsen said he was excited for the planning process to incorporate the existing DNR land, and that the two parcels could be at least partially tied together into one park. It’s a historically significant area — the point at the end of Fort Johnson Road is where the first shots of the Civil War were fired on Fort Sumter.

In the meantime, nothing will change on the land any time soon. As a condition of the sale, the sisters are allowed to stay on the property through at least June 2022, with an option to extend to December 2022.

The nuns were looking to move as their members age and new women don’t join the ranks. Sister Mary Joseph Ritter confirmed that the congregation planned to relocate to the Bishop Gadsden retirement home, but the transition wouldn’t come until next year.

“We’re on the waiting list, just like everybody else,” she said.

The congregation didn’t have any further details on the move, she said, but would have more to say in the coming months about how they hope to preserve their legacy.

Twelve members remain among the Sisters of Charity, a congregation that has ministered in Charleston since 1829. Through its history, the group ran a school for free children of color in the 1840s, cared for both Union and Confederate wounded soldiers during the Civil War, and founded the hospital that would evolve into the Roper-St. Francis health care system.

The sisters moved to their current home on James Island in the 1950s.

“The whole world changed:” James Island woman hosts two Ukrainian refugees

Anna thought the name “Kitty” for her cat was pretty creative. It wasn’t a word you heard often where she lived. In Kramatorsk, everyone spoke Ukrainian or Russian.Now, the only memory she has of Kitty is a Polaroid photo.When Russian troops invaded Ukraine in February the Polaroid was one of the few things Anna put in her one, hastily packed suitcase. Since then, the Polaroid has traveled with her to Poland, Latvia, Mexico, Texas, New York and finally South Carolina.In the months since the invasion, An...

Anna thought the name “Kitty” for her cat was pretty creative. It wasn’t a word you heard often where she lived. In Kramatorsk, everyone spoke Ukrainian or Russian.

Now, the only memory she has of Kitty is a Polaroid photo.

When Russian troops invaded Ukraine in February the Polaroid was one of the few things Anna put in her one, hastily packed suitcase. Since then, the Polaroid has traveled with her to Poland, Latvia, Mexico, Texas, New York and finally South Carolina.

In the months since the invasion, Anna and her husband Eric, have traveled some 9,500 miles seeking a new home. They have asked not to share their last names to preserve their safety.

“We decided to move very far,” Anna said. “I want to have a family, grow children and just be safe.”

She packed some winter clothes for the bitter Ukrainian and Polish temperatures they first encountered, her laptop and a couple of the children’s books she had illustrated back when she had a seemingly normal life. She had a job as a graphic designer and an apartment with Eric.

“We moved to Kramatorsk because it had better conditions for us and we decided to stay there. But the whole world changed. All our plans we built, our apartment,” Eric said. “We miss our home.”

At one point the couple was separated at the U.S.-Mexico border while seeking asylum. They read from bloggers that it was the best route to take to receive a special visa specifically for Ukrainians. Eric was sent back to Reynosa, Mexico, while Anna was allowed to stay across the border in McAllen, Texas. The couple, married for two years, weren’t sure when, or if, they would see each other again.

“We were very upset and I had no way back,” Eric said. “I had no connections, no service, nothing. I don’t speak Spanish. I had stress because I didn’t know what happened with Anna and I didn’t know what I needed to do now.”

Anna went to stay with a family friend in New York and met with an immigration attorney who told her she could add Eric, who is originally from Latvia, to her asylum application. When they got back in touch with each other, Eric came to meet her on a tourist visa.

Eric and Anna are two of an estimated 6.6 million people who have fled Ukraine since February, according to the United Nations Refugee Agency. As of April, there were an estimated 15,000 Ukrainian refugees in the United States, the Associated Press reports.

But entry through Mexico is no longer accepted except in “extreme circumstances,” the AP reports. Instead, the U.S. began a new program that requires people or organizations in the U.S. to sponsor Ukrainian refugees before they may enter. The goal is to accept 100,000 refugees into the U.S.

“A lot of Ukrainian people still stay in Mexico and don’t have any opportunity to come here because now it is different rules to come to America,” Eric said. “We’re lucky.”

Choosing Charleston

Some 800 miles away from Brooklyn, Julie Uhler was reading headlines about the war in Ukraine from her home on James Island when she came across a website called www.UkraineTakeShelter.com. Divorced, with her two adult daughters living on their own, Uhler felt compelled to offer up a room.

“I had a couple of friends that were like, ‘what are you doing,’” Uhler said. ”’And I’m like, ‘you know, I don’t know. But how can I not? I’m a mom.’”

Two FaceTime calls with Eric and Anna later and the pair were boarding a plane to Charleston. They knew nothing about the Lowcountry but Anna said she found common ground with Uhler who is also an artist.

The first day was awkward, Uhler admitted with a laugh. She had two strangers in her home, worlds away from the life they knew, still practicing their English.

But it didn’t take long for the trio to settle in. Eric and Anna call Uhler their “American mom.”

With no specific plan in place, Uhler started chipping away slowly at tasks that might be helpful while also trying not to overwhelm the couple. She posted on the neighborhood social media app NextDoor asking for clothing donations that were better suited for a South Carolina summer than a Ukraine winter. One neighbor donated a pair of bikes.

“Day by day. That’s how we’re living,” Uhler said.

Most days over the last two weeks at Uhler’s house, Anna and Eric have worked on Anna’s asylum application and caught up on news of the war with friends and family now scattered throughout Europe. Anna can only communicate with her father and stepfather through text message because they are in the Ukrainian military.

But the couple is forging ahead in Charleston getting more comfortable. Uhler has cooked meals, taken the couple to downtown Charleston, helped find Eric a barber shop and learned to use Google Translate. They also made their first trip to Folly Beach.

“Now we are thinking about being surfers,” Eric said.

The couple can’t find work until their visas are approved, so in the meantime Uhler set up a fundraiser and plans to host them for as long as they need. If given the opportunity, she said she’d do it again.

James Island woman founds housing nonprofit to help single moms going back to school

JAMES ISLAND — Rebekah Lambooy knows the financial burdens single mothers face living in the Charleston region where housing costs have risen dramatically in recent years.Lambooy, a single mom of three — two boys and a girl — struggled after her divorce in 2012 to make ends meet. At the time, she had been paying just under $1,000 in rent. She didn’t qualify for government assistance because her income was just below the federal threshold.Lambooy decided in 2012 to return to college and complete her bache...

JAMES ISLAND — Rebekah Lambooy knows the financial burdens single mothers face living in the Charleston region where housing costs have risen dramatically in recent years.

Lambooy, a single mom of three — two boys and a girl — struggled after her divorce in 2012 to make ends meet. At the time, she had been paying just under $1,000 in rent. She didn’t qualify for government assistance because her income was just below the federal threshold.

Lambooy decided in 2012 to return to college and complete her bachelor’s degree to advance her career. In 2016, she obtained her business degree from the College of Charleston, earning her a raise at her job as a paralegal.

But Lambooy also used her business knowledge to establish a nonprofit that seeks to help other single mothers in similar situations. The James Island resident formed HerIndependence, which provides affordable housing for single mothers obtaining post-secondary education.

Lambooy said she’s grateful to be able to help provide some financial relief for mothers making an effort to advance their education in order to provide for their families.

“I’ve been there, done that,” she said. “I want to help somebody with just a portion of assistance that I can do.”

Lambooy got interested in housing while in college, and the interest inspired her to get a real estate license after graduating. She had also been noticing the rising costs of rent that had taking shape over the years, and she saw affordable housing as a path that could help families in need.

HerIndependence now owns three houses. Two had been abandoned buildings before the nonprofit refurbished them. They house two families where single mothers are heading back to school.

A third home is currently being redone for a new family.

The organization said it has relied mostly on federal housing funds funneled through the city of North Charleston. But as construction costs rise, Lambooy fears it could impact her organization’s ability to provide housing. She eventually wants the group to expand and host multiple projects across the region.

Donations can be made online at herindependence.com.

“This isn’t a handout,” said board member Jennifer Abrusia. “This is a way to help people who want to help themselves.”

Abrusia and Lambooy are friends who initially bonded over shared experiences. Like Lambooy, Abrusia was a single mother who struggled at times financially. The two also share the fact that they each received strong support from relatives.

“We both have kind of walked this path a little bit,” Abrusia said.

Lambooy recalled the difficult journey of balancing classes, children and a full-time job.

She scheduled her college courses at 8 a.m. so she’d be home in time to take her children to school. She’d then go to work, and then pick them up from school in the afternoon. Her day wasn’t complete until she’d finished taking them to their sports and other extracurricular activities.

Lambooy, too, said she’s thankful for those who stepped in and gave her a helping hand.

“I have a lot of supportive friends and family,” she said.

James Island community seeks Charleston County Historical Designation

Residents of Beefield on James Island want their community placed on the Charleston County Historic District.JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The Beefield community on James Island is small, but the people make up a tight-knit and passionate neighborhood with a lot of stories.Community president George Richardson says between the military events, a sense of community and peaceful nature, it’s more important than ever to preserve Beefield’s history. To that end, he and his neighbors came out to a county meeting Tuesday ni...

Residents of Beefield on James Island want their community placed on the Charleston County Historic District.

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The Beefield community on James Island is small, but the people make up a tight-knit and passionate neighborhood with a lot of stories.

Community president George Richardson says between the military events, a sense of community and peaceful nature, it’s more important than ever to preserve Beefield’s history. To that end, he and his neighbors came out to a county meeting Tuesday night to make their voice heard.

“Because when you start walking the dirt road, we’re all in the woods or the trees. It’s almost like you’re in another world. And just beyond that, the Folly Road we’re all in traffic running up and down Folly Beach, you forget all about that is like stepping into another time is peaceful. And that’s what my community loves,” Richardson says.

The “Bee Tract” is almost 60 acres of land on James Island off Folly Road at Battery Island Drive. Richardson says it is the site of important Civil War history including the 1862 Battle of Secessionville and an 1864 third Assault on James Island.

It is also part of an African American remnant freedman community.

“You drive down battery Island drive, which is along the stream, you’ll notice that every house has at least two oak trees in the front yard, and they’re draped in one straight line from one end to the other end,” he says. “You know, and we like that. We sit on our porch and we yell over to each other and that kind of thing.”

The South Carolina Battleground Preservation Trust says the archeological significance from battles is there and has been well preserved so far. Most of the land has been passed down to family members since they bought it in 1872.

Justin Schwebler, property manager for the Historic Charleston Foundation, says the status is an extra layer of protection and recognition for the people and their land.

“Basically, what that does is creating a process properties boundary around these original parcels of the historic district gives them an extra layer of protection against inappropriate development, things like that. So if anybody wants to come into the community change uses build a highway or something or build a hotel or restaurants,” Schwebler says.

The planning and public works committee will have a meeting about the Beefield land on April 21 and a proposal will come back for Charleston County Council to consider on April 26.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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