Throw Lumber Jill’s | 4650 Ladson Road | Suite 205 Summerville, SC 29485

Axe throwing in North Charleston SC

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The Most Exciting Live Entertainment Game in South Carolina

If you're looking for an adrenaline-filled, pulse-pounding way to have fun all day, grab an axe and get your throw on at Lumber Jill's! Axe throwing is the newest, most popular live entertainment game in the Lowcountry. It's kind of like darts...but with axes! Axe throwing is great for a few hours of amusement, stress relief, team building, and even corporate events in North Charleston, SC. Whether you're looking for a great way to celebrate the weekend or want a new idea for your company event, Lumber Jill's has got you covered.

The Lumber Jill's revolution began after co-owners Jill and Heath spent a date night with friends throwing axes in Charleston. After having so much fun, the entrepreneurial couple quickly realized they could create their own take on axe throwing. Soon after, Lumber Jill's was born!

The name Lumber Jill's isn't just a play on our co-owner's name - it involves a really interesting piece of history too. Across the pond, the Women's Timber Corps "manned" the lumber yards in England while the men were serving in WWII. They affectionately became known as Lumberjills, Britain's answer to Rosie the Riveter. Without these brave ladies, Lumber Jill's wouldn't exist. We would be remiss if we didn't salute them for the example they set!

At the end of the day, we want to provide every one of our guests with an outstanding axe-throwing experience. So, grab your friends, co-workers, family, or favorite people and join us for an axe-throwing party you won't soon forget.

Service Area

Axe Throwing Leagues North Charleston, SC

Why is Axe Throwing in North Charleston, SC So Popular?

Axes haven't been this popular in America since "The Shining" hit theaters way back in 1980!

In cities all around the nation, axe-throwing facilities are popping up left and right as a fun, healthy way for people of all ages to congregate and enjoy a night of friendly competition and stress relief. In the last few years, the sport of axe throwing has exploded - so much so that the World Axe Throwing League was assembled in 2017 to coordinate international axe-throwing competitions. Since that time, many axe-throwing events have popped up on national TV stations like ESPN.

 Axe Throwing North Charleston, SC
But why is axe throwing so popular? Here are just a few reasons why Lumber Jill's and axe throwing as a whole is a hit in South Carolina:
stress-relief
Stress Relief

Perhaps the most popular reason folks love axe throwing in North Charleston is for stress relief. We've even heard some customers say it's a cheaper form of therapy! In reality, axe tossing gives you a therapeutic release that is hard to replicate. A few hard throws with an axe and your body releases a flood of endorphins, which help increase your energy, improve your mood, and facilitate healthy blood flow. If you have pent-up anger, nothing feels better than chucking a heavy axe at a target. Hitting a bullseye is even better!

exercise
Exercise

Since axe throwing is such an exhilarating activity, many people don't realize that they are exercising their arms, legs, abs, pecs, and even back when they come to Lumber Jill's. Like high-intensity interval training (HIIT) workouts, axe throwing works several muscle groups at once. These exercises strengthen your core and help define your muscles. When coupled with a healthy diet, regular axe-throwing activities can even help you shed a few pounds.

Corporate Comradery
Corporate Comradery

You might be surprised to hear that axe throwing is one of the most sought-after company event ideas in North Charleston, SC. Sure, your colleagues might think it's a little weird to host a corporate meeting at an axe-throwing facility. But once your co-worker hits their target, they'll quickly understand how much fun they can have. Perhaps more importantly, axe tossing is a safe, fun way to conduct trust exercises and build team morale overall.

Unique Way to Have Fun
Unique Way to Have Fun

When you get right down to it, axe throwing is good, clean, healthy fun. Axe throwing helps relieve shoulder tension, while laughing helps engage your body's core. When you throw in an adult beverage or two, laughs become easier and fun flows more freely. You can't help but have the time of your life at Lumber Jill's in the Lowcountry.

Family Fun
Family Fun

Axe throwing isn't reserved only for adults - kids can get in on the fun and excitement too. Our warm, inviting atmosphere inspires people to embrace their inner champion, even if they're under 18. At Lumber Jill's, we can accommodate kids ages 10 and up. Before we pass them an axe, we will evaluate their skill level to ensure their safety. Contact us today for more info on birthday celebrations and whole facility rentals.

At Your Next Corporate Event

Status quote, average, ordinary...these are qualities that no employer would want out of their employees. So, why host a team-building event at a venue with the same characteristics?

If you're on the hunt for corporate event venues in North Charleston, SC, you just hit the jackpot. We may be a little biased, but Lumber Jill's is a fantastic corporate event venue for companies looking to try something new.

Axe throwing for corporate events is fun, high-energy, and safe for all your employees. We're talking an adrenaline-filled day with your own private axe-throwing lanes. Get your clients or your team out of the office and give them something to be excited about!

Here are just a few reasons to reserve our facility for your company get together:

 Axe Throwing Center North Charleston, SC
  • No Suit or Tie Required: Feel like taking a casual day? No judgments here! The only thing that matters is that you hit your target (or try your best to do so).
  • No Rain Delays: Unlike some outdoor venues, Lumber Jill's won't delay or cancel your event if it starts raining outside. We're here to make your corporate event more fun, rain or shine.
  • Skill Not Required: Never thrown an axe in your life? Have poor hand-to-eye coordination? Don't sweat it. Our coaches are know how to teach first-timers the positions and techniques they need to have a blast.
  • Large Groups Welcome: Do you have 20 or more people confirmed for your corporate event? We can make room for your whole team! Give us a shout and let us know about your upcoming event. That way, we can block off your desired day so you can have our entire facility to yourself.
  • Safety First: We take safety very seriously at Lumber Jill's. As such, we have implemented several safety rules to protect your team and ensure they have the best time possible.

Birthdays, Celebrations, and Reunions, Oh My!

In addition to our standard reservations, we are happy to offer celebration, corporate, and full facility rental packages. Planning a surprise birthday party for your best friend? Celebrating a life event with that special someone? Looking for a spot for your family reunion? Axe throwing in North Charleston, SC is the perfect activity for your group! For the most memorable (or hazy) celebration, don't forget to ask us about alcoholic beverage service and additional lane time.

If you want to spice up your next birthday party or take your bachelorette party to the next level, our celebration package is the perfect fit. This package includes:
  • 2 lanes
  • 1 designated coach
  • 1.5 hours of axe throwing
  • Free shirt for a special guest
  • Table coverings
  • 1 drink for each guest
  • 12 axe throwers
  • 45 total minutes of throwing time
 Axe Throwing Location North Charleston, SC

Please note that our celebration package is designed for customers over the age of 12. Two adults must be present at all times.

Common Questions. Helpful Answers.

We understand that axe throwing isn't your typical date night or even guy's night activity. We get it - you're hurling real axes at a target that is only a few feet away. On the surface, that can sound a little scary. But don't worry, many of our first-time guests have questions about how our process works too.

This is a great question and one that we receive quite often (crazy, right?). Axe throwing at Lumber Jill's is absolutely safe. In fact, safety is our #1 priority and has been since day one. Our knowledgeable axe-throwing coaches are trained to keep a keen eye on every axe thrower, whether they're solo or with a group. If, for ANY REASON our coaches feel like a person shouldn't throw an axe, they will not be permitted to do so. To help keep our facility safe, please refrain from bringing your own axe to Lumber Jill's. The same goes for any other kind of throwable object.
The easiest, fastest way to book your axe-throwing lane is to make your reservation online. Walk-ins are welcomed, but we cannot guarantee that we will have a spot open for you or your party. For inquiries about corporate events, facility rentals, or large celebrations, please contact us directly at (843)-879-3030.
We suggest you wear something that you find comfy and easy to wear for a few hours. Don't wear anything that will restrict your movement. The biggest "no-no" we have in terms of dress code is open-toed shoes, which are not allowed. If you pop in for a last-minute axe-throwing session, and need a pair of shoes, don't fret. We offer shoe rentals for $3 per person.
Unfortunately, we are not permitted to allow outside axes at Lumber Jill's. The same goes for any other object like throwing stars or throwing knives. We've got all you need to have the time of your life, including throwing axes.
Yes, absolutely. We are proud to have a wide selection of alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks to keep you cool and hydrated. If you're feeling hangry, don't worry. We have plenty of tasty snacks to munch on if your tummy starts to rumble.

Axe of Kindness

One of the best parts of owning Lumber Jill's is our ability to give back to our local community. We are always on the hunt for new, inventive ways to serve our citizens. That's why, once a month, we host Axe of Kindness night to shine a light on an important organization, charity, or good cause. These exciting events give our customers a compelling way to make a real difference in someone's life.

If you have a donation request or are interested in hosting a fundraiser with Lumber Jill's, send us your info at

aok@throwlumberjills.com.

Latest News in North Charleston, SC

North Charleston holding meeting on Park Circle development

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of North Charleston is holding a drop-in informational meeting Monday regarding community development within Park Circle, as progress on the area’s redevelopment continues.The meeting will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Park Circle Gallery. TJ Rostin, recreation director for the City of North Charleston, says they want to inform the public at the meeting about some aspects of the project that they feel are “necessary.”According to the city, the redevelopment wi...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The City of North Charleston is holding a drop-in informational meeting Monday regarding community development within Park Circle, as progress on the area’s redevelopment continues.

The meeting will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Park Circle Gallery. TJ Rostin, recreation director for the City of North Charleston, says they want to inform the public at the meeting about some aspects of the project that they feel are “necessary.”

According to the city, the redevelopment will include a new community building with a theater and meeting rooms, a performance and event space, a nature garden, open green space, walking trails, an inclusive baseball field, and the largest inclusive playground in the Southeast, at 55,000 square feet.

Rostin says there will also be a farmer’s market pavilion that will be constructed outside. Rostin says the facility isn’t just for recreation, but it will have a large cultural arts impact as well.

“We’re trying to be able to provide more things for more people, and we feel right now that probably the therapeutic aspect of our facility needs a little uplifting, needs a little more programming that could be provided to them,” Rostin said.

With inclusivity at the forefront of the project, Rostin says they want to be able to serve people from age 0 to age 100.

“We think with this facility we’re gonna be able to do that in different ways,” Rostin said. “We know there’s folks out there who don’t have the ability to be a on a playground that’s not inclusive that may be 40, 50, 60 years old.”

Clint Davis of Charleston says he comes to Park Circle often because it has less “hustle and bustle” and less tourists. He says, for him, the more parks, the better.

“We’ve never really been to like the Park Circle, Davis said. “We’ve been like around the perimeter, like to all the restaurants over there so that will give us more incentive to come to the parks around here.”

TJ Rostin says they are currently still in the design-build phase. Rostin says we can expect the demolition of the current facility in the next week or two. He says he hopes to have construction starting in the next few months.

Rostin says the project is estimated to be completed by Fall of 2023.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Editorial: North Charleston needs to change its election rules

A court likely will decide whether North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey’s past behavior toward a city employee crossed the legal line that separates sexual harassment from poor judgment, but whatever the outcome, the news reminds all of us that he won’t be mayor forever.Mr. Summey, 75, was widely expected not to seek reelection next year long before longtime staffer DeLisa Reynolds went public with claims that the mayor repeatedly made sexual advances toward her two decades ago and more recently attempted to punish her afte...

A court likely will decide whether North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey’s past behavior toward a city employee crossed the legal line that separates sexual harassment from poor judgment, but whatever the outcome, the news reminds all of us that he won’t be mayor forever.

Mr. Summey, 75, was widely expected not to seek reelection next year long before longtime staffer DeLisa Reynolds went public with claims that the mayor repeatedly made sexual advances toward her two decades ago and more recently attempted to punish her after one of her family members criticized the mayor’s son on social media. Regardless of who people believe most, the accusations are troubling. Even though Mr. Summey has acknowledged having a stripper strip in City Hall about 12 years ago was “a stupid thing” and says it “has never occurred again and won’t” (a tangential allegation Ms. Reynolds made to The Post and Courier’s Tony Bartelme), it’s safe to say some damage has been done, to him and the community.

For residents, business owners and others who care about North Charleston, this is a reminder that the city soon will be at a crossroads that will help determine its future.

After North Charleston voters go to the polls in November 2023, the city likely will have its first new mayor in more than a quarter of a century. The field of candidates is far from set — and Mr. Summey could surprise us and run yet again — but it’s not too soon for City Council to rectify an election format that we see as a potential land mine.

Under the current rules, the city’s next mayor could take office with as little as 30% of the vote, possibly even less. City Council should change the rules to require the next mayor to get at least 50% of the vote; such a change might mean a Nov. 7, 2023, election and a Nov. 21 runoff between the top two mayoral vote getters.

North Charleston is one of only a handful of cities in South Carolina — and the only large city — that declares a winner based on a simple plurality. The vast majority of cities and towns mirror South Carolina’s primary election laws, which call for a runoff if no one receives 50% of the vote plus one.

This unique feature frankly has gone largely unnoticed because of Mayor Summey’s political dominance over the years; he has had plenty of challengers but few if any close calls. But with a potentially crowded, Summey-less field next year, the odds are greater than ever that the next mayor of South Carolina’s third-largest city might get the job without any kind of mandate.

We believe now is the time for City Council to change the rules to require a runoff. Waiting longer, until the mayoral field starts to firm up, would reduce the chances of success because any change would be filtered more through the lens of which challenger might be helped or hurt.

Ideally, City Council also would change its election rules to stagger the election of its 10 council seats; currently, they all are up for grabs next year, too, but we believe the city would gain valuable stability and continuity if only five council seats were filled in any given election, with the other five elected two years later.

North Charleston is celebrating its 50th anniversary this week, and the milestone should remind us all how much the city has grown and changed in recent years — and how increasingly important it has become and will continue to be to our region’s economy, transportation network and overall quality of life.

This is nowhere near the same city that existed when Mayor Summey moved into City Hall in 1994, and he gets a good chunk of the credit for that.

City Council members should act now to ensure the city’s next mayor, whoever that may be, gets off on the best possible footing.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Immersive Van Gogh exhibit coming to North Charleston

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- The acclaimed Vincent Van Gogh exhibit that brings the artist’s most influential works to life is making a stop at the Charleston Area Convention Center this summer.Beyond Van Gogh: The Immersive Experience is the largest immersive art experience in the county and has sold more than 2.5 million tickets globally. The highly anticipated show runs from July 16 through September 4 and features more than 300 Van Gogh pieces in a unique three-dimensional display that covers more than 30,000 square feet....

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- The acclaimed Vincent Van Gogh exhibit that brings the artist’s most influential works to life is making a stop at the Charleston Area Convention Center this summer.

Beyond Van Gogh: The Immersive Experience is the largest immersive art experience in the county and has sold more than 2.5 million tickets globally. The highly anticipated show runs from July 16 through September 4 and features more than 300 Van Gogh pieces in a unique three-dimensional display that covers more than 30,000 square feet.

The exhibit space is engulfed in digital projections–made up of four trillion content pixels–of Van Gogh’s most recognizable pieces and self-portraits including “Starry Night,” “Sunflowers,” and ” Café Terrace at Night.”

But the exhibit is not just visual. It also features a symphonic score of Van Gogh’s dreams, thoughts, and words for an unmatched narrative experience.

The experience was created by French-Canadian Creative Director Mathieu St-Arnaud.

“An imaginative and fully-immersive adventure, Beyond Van Gogh takes on the challenge of breathing new life into Van Gogh’s vast body of work. Through the use of cutting-edge 3D projection technology and music to illuminate all of his genius, guests can experience the artist with all their senses,” St-Arnaud, Normal Studio said.

As guests go through the exhibit, they will journey from the Introduction Hall to the Waterfall Room to the Immersive Experience Room, all of which flow fluidly into each other enveloping guests in the beautiful landscapes and colorful flowers that Van Gogh is known for.

“This distinctive and unique multimedia artistic adventure is deeply resonating with audiences. Encompassing a refreshing new twist unlike art lovers have seen before, Beyond Van Gogh gives a new appreciation of this tortured artist’s stunning work. Unsurprisingly, millions of people all over the world credit Van Gogh with enhancing their relationship with art. Beyond Van Gogh will only strengthen that connection,” Justin Paquin, Producer, Paquin Entertainment Group said

Beyond Van Gogh: The Immersive Experience will be open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online at vangoghcharleston.com/.

Awendaw sues Elliott Summey over sand mine and park project

AWENDAW — Elliott Summey, head of South Carolina’s largest airport, used the town of Awendaw’s natural resources for personal gain during his private company’s work on an unfinished park here, a new lawsuit by the town alleges.The lawsuit echoes the findings in ...

AWENDAW — Elliott Summey, head of South Carolina’s largest airport, used the town of Awendaw’s natural resources for personal gain during his private company’s work on an unfinished park here, a new lawsuit by the town alleges.

The lawsuit echoes the findings in “Sand Man,” a report last year by The Post and Courier-led Uncovered investigative reporting collaboration.

That report revealed how Summey’s company, Jackson Development, mined millions of dollars in sand and dirt from the park site, then left Awendaw in the dark about how much money he made and how much money taxpayers should have received in royalties.

Filed June 10, the town’s 16-page complaint went a few steps further.

Among its allegations:

Summey, a former Charleston County Council chairman and son of North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey, said his attorney has been trying to resolve disputes through arbitration and mediation.

“Now that the town has filed a lawsuit, this will allow all the facts to be presented in a fair, transparent and public manner,” he said. Summey declined to discuss specific allegations raised by the lawsuit.

Awendaw Town Attorney Toya Hampton acknowledged that “passions are running high” about the park. “The Town is standing up for its rights under the agreement through the lawsuit.”

The lawsuit didn’t specify an amount it’s seeking.

The lawsuit is the latest chapter in the controversial project.

In 2009, Charleston County Council voted to use Greenbelt money to buy 290 acres off Doar Road. On council then, Summey was a deciding vote. Three years later, Summey created Jackson Development — and scored a deal to mine the land’s sand.

The deal called for Jackson Development to spend $500,000 to help Awendaw build a park. Once it hit that $500,000 mark, Summey’s company was supposed to pay Awendaw an additional 50 cents for every cubic yard excavated from the site — and more if the price of dirt rose, which it did significantly over the coming years.

The town hoped to use these royalties to finish the park.

But Summey’s company turned over far less royalty money than the town expected, about $150,000.

And while the site has a large lake from the sand mining operation, the park itself remains unfinished. The town recently unveiled a new plan featuring disc golf, an amphitheater and space for overnight camping. But it remains unclear how the town will pay for this work.

With the park project in limbo, Summey and the town have been battling over the royalties.

According to the town’s agreement with Jackson Development, Summey’s company was supposed to hand over detailed receipts, canceled checks, invoices and other documentation about his mining progress.

But Summey and his contractor, Robert Collins Co., failed to do so, the lawsuit alleged.

Amid this vacuum of documentation, Awendaw Town Council in October 2020 hired the Greenville-based Wyche firm to challenge Summey.

Summey, meanwhile, left his County Council post for a job as chief executive officer of Charleston International Airport, earning more than $318,000 in salary and perks.

The lawsuit raises new questions about Summey’s mix of public and private ventures.

Summey has created about 20 private corporations, according to state and court records. Most appear to involve real estate ventures, with the notable exception of Jackson Development.

The lawsuit alleged that Jackson Development was a “corporate fiction ... used by Summey as a means of evading legal obligations,” and that Summey should be personally liable.

The lawsuit also discussed a large berm Summey and his company built on the site.

Running parallel to Doar Road, the berm was supposed to protect a nearby neighborhood from dust and noise. A permit from the state Department of Health and Environmental Control required that the berm be made from topsoil from the park site.

But according to the lawsuit, Summey and his company violated the permit by packing the berm with concrete, asphalt, rebar, items of clothing and other trash, earning at least $100,000.

Doing this violated DHEC permit requirements and will force the town to spend at least $150,000 to fix new drainage problems created by the berm, the lawsuit alleged.

According to a DHEC inspection report in 2020, Summey’s company was supposed to remove the berm.

The lawsuit also claimed that Summey and his company sold timber from the Awendaw tract without paying the town.

It concluded by alleging Summey misused and converted the town’s resources “for personal gain to fund Defendants’ own businesses at the expense of the Town and its residents and taxpayers.”

The Awendaw project’s problems have had a ripple effect beyond Elliott Summey.

A North Charleston city employee, DeLisa Reynolds, alleges that Mayor Keith Summey retaliated against her after one of her family members posted a negative comment on Instagram about Elliott Summey’s work in Awendaw. She has filed formal complaints with the city of North Charleston and the S.C. Human Rights Commission.

Thirteen years have passed since Charleston County voted to buy the Doar Road property with public Greenbelt money. But the park site remains empty, save for a few dirt roads, a power pole, a water well and a large berm overlooking a lake.

Beyond what happened and didn’t happen in Awendaw, the project highlights a weakness in the state ethics laws.

In The Post and Courier’s October report, Summey said he was told by the State Ethics Commission that he didn’t have to report the money he made in Awendaw, prompting a government watchdog to say that it was “appalling that millions of dollars are not really accounted for.”

McMaster says Biden’s gun control proposals ‘could intrude’ on Second Amendment rights

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - While President Joe Biden is calling for tighter gun control laws across the country, South Carolinians should not expect the same from their leader.Republican Gov. Henry McMaster said he believes some of the president’s proposals could infringe on Second Amendment rights.Among the measures Biden proposed in his address to the nation last Thursday were banning assau...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - While President Joe Biden is calling for tighter gun control laws across the country, South Carolinians should not expect the same from their leader.

Republican Gov. Henry McMaster said he believes some of the president’s proposals could infringe on Second Amendment rights.

Among the measures Biden proposed in his address to the nation last Thursday were banning assault rifles or raising the age at which people can purchase them, along with expanding background checks and red flag laws.

“Everyone in the country has a right, unless they’ve been adjudicated otherwise, to have a firearm or have numerous firearms, and I think some of things the president is suggesting are intruding or could intrude into that Second Amendment area,” McMaster told reporters Friday during a visit to North Charleston.

But the governor reiterated his previously vouched support for tougher penalties for people caught illegally carrying guns.

He supports a proposal from state Sen. Dick Harpootlian, D – Richland, that would increase the minimum fines and prison time for people caught unlawfully possessing guns and make that offense a felony. Harpootlian’s proposal also calls for bond to be set by a circuit court judge instead of a magistrate and would not allow solicitors to be able to reduce the charge if someone was illegally carrying.

Both McMaster and Harpootlian are former prosecutors.

“Those are good ideas,” the governor said. “This is very serious. We need to be very serious about it.”

Biden’s address to the country came in the wake of an influx of incidents of deadly gun violence in recent weeks across the country, including in South Carolina.

Renewed calls nationwide for gun control and enhanced school safety measures were sparked after an 18-year-old gunman murdered 19 children and two teachers at a Texas elementary school last month.

When asked about school safety specifically, McMaster pointed toward money the South Carolina General Assembly allocated in recent years to put an armed and trained school resource officer on every campus.

While these officers’ presence has significantly increased over the last few years, about 300 of South Carolina’s 1,200-plus schools still do not have an SRO, according to the governor.

“We have the money for it, but it’s hard to find the officers to take those jobs, just like it’s hard to find people to take a lot of other jobs,” he said.

McMaster said the state is also working to increase access to mental health resources in schools.

A recent audit by the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, at the governor’s request, found these services are available in fewer than half of the state’s public schools.

“We’re always looking, and we’re studying what they’re doing in other states, talking to others around the country to see what works and what would work better, if anything, in our state,” McMaster said of school safety measures as a whole.

The General Assembly closed its 2022 regular legislative session last month, so state lawmakers are away from the State House for the most part the rest of this year.

When asked if he felt gun violence and school safety were issues he would like legislators to take up when they return to Columbia later this month to finalize the state budget or in a potential special session later this year, McMaster answered instead that he wants South Carolinians to know that if they see something that could lead to gun violence to say something.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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