Throw Lumber Jill’s | 4650 Ladson Road | Suite 205 Summerville, SC 29485

Axe throwing in Seabrook Island SC

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The Most Exciting Live Entertainment Game in South Carolina

If you're looking for an adrenaline-filled, pulse-pounding way to have fun all day, grab an axe and get your throw on at Lumber Jill's! Axe throwing is the newest, most popular live entertainment game in the Lowcountry. It's kind of like darts...but with axes! Axe throwing is great for a few hours of amusement, stress relief, team building, and even corporate events in Seabrook Island, SC. Whether you're looking for a great way to celebrate the weekend or want a new idea for your company event, Lumber Jill's has got you covered.

The Lumber Jill's revolution began after co-owners Jill and Heath spent a date night with friends throwing axes in Charleston. After having so much fun, the entrepreneurial couple quickly realized they could create their own take on axe throwing. Soon after, Lumber Jill's was born!

The name Lumber Jill's isn't just a play on our co-owner's name - it involves a really interesting piece of history too. Across the pond, the Women's Timber Corps "manned" the lumber yards in England while the men were serving in WWII. They affectionately became known as Lumberjills, Britain's answer to Rosie the Riveter. Without these brave ladies, Lumber Jill's wouldn't exist. We would be remiss if we didn't salute them for the example they set!

At the end of the day, we want to provide every one of our guests with an outstanding axe-throwing experience. So, grab your friends, co-workers, family, or favorite people and join us for an axe-throwing party you won't soon forget.

Service Area

Axe Throwing Leagues Seabrook Island, SC

Why is Axe Throwing in Seabrook Island, SC So Popular?

Axes haven't been this popular in America since "The Shining" hit theaters way back in 1980!

In cities all around the nation, axe-throwing facilities are popping up left and right as a fun, healthy way for people of all ages to congregate and enjoy a night of friendly competition and stress relief. In the last few years, the sport of axe throwing has exploded - so much so that the World Axe Throwing League was assembled in 2017 to coordinate international axe-throwing competitions. Since that time, many axe-throwing events have popped up on national TV stations like ESPN.

 Axe Throwing Seabrook Island, SC
But why is axe throwing so popular? Here are just a few reasons why Lumber Jill's and axe throwing as a whole is a hit in South Carolina:
stress-relief
Stress Relief

Perhaps the most popular reason folks love axe throwing in Seabrook Island is for stress relief. We've even heard some customers say it's a cheaper form of therapy! In reality, axe tossing gives you a therapeutic release that is hard to replicate. A few hard throws with an axe and your body releases a flood of endorphins, which help increase your energy, improve your mood, and facilitate healthy blood flow. If you have pent-up anger, nothing feels better than chucking a heavy axe at a target. Hitting a bullseye is even better!

exercise
Exercise

Since axe throwing is such an exhilarating activity, many people don't realize that they are exercising their arms, legs, abs, pecs, and even back when they come to Lumber Jill's. Like high-intensity interval training (HIIT) workouts, axe throwing works several muscle groups at once. These exercises strengthen your core and help define your muscles. When coupled with a healthy diet, regular axe-throwing activities can even help you shed a few pounds.

Corporate Comradery
Corporate Comradery

You might be surprised to hear that axe throwing is one of the most sought-after company event ideas in Seabrook Island, SC. Sure, your colleagues might think it's a little weird to host a corporate meeting at an axe-throwing facility. But once your co-worker hits their target, they'll quickly understand how much fun they can have. Perhaps more importantly, axe tossing is a safe, fun way to conduct trust exercises and build team morale overall.

Unique Way to Have Fun
Unique Way to Have Fun

When you get right down to it, axe throwing is good, clean, healthy fun. Axe throwing helps relieve shoulder tension, while laughing helps engage your body's core. When you throw in an adult beverage or two, laughs become easier and fun flows more freely. You can't help but have the time of your life at Lumber Jill's in the Lowcountry.

Family Fun
Family Fun

Axe throwing isn't reserved only for adults - kids can get in on the fun and excitement too. Our warm, inviting atmosphere inspires people to embrace their inner champion, even if they're under 18. At Lumber Jill's, we can accommodate kids ages 10 and up. Before we pass them an axe, we will evaluate their skill level to ensure their safety. Contact us today for more info on birthday celebrations and whole facility rentals.

At Your Next Corporate Event

Status quote, average, ordinary...these are qualities that no employer would want out of their employees. So, why host a team-building event at a venue with the same characteristics?

If you're on the hunt for corporate event venues in Seabrook Island, SC, you just hit the jackpot. We may be a little biased, but Lumber Jill's is a fantastic corporate event venue for companies looking to try something new.

Axe throwing for corporate events is fun, high-energy, and safe for all your employees. We're talking an adrenaline-filled day with your own private axe-throwing lanes. Get your clients or your team out of the office and give them something to be excited about!

Here are just a few reasons to reserve our facility for your company get together:

 Axe Throwing Center Seabrook Island, SC
  • No Suit or Tie Required: Feel like taking a casual day? No judgments here! The only thing that matters is that you hit your target (or try your best to do so).
  • No Rain Delays: Unlike some outdoor venues, Lumber Jill's won't delay or cancel your event if it starts raining outside. We're here to make your corporate event more fun, rain or shine.
  • Skill Not Required: Never thrown an axe in your life? Have poor hand-to-eye coordination? Don't sweat it. Our coaches are know how to teach first-timers the positions and techniques they need to have a blast.
  • Large Groups Welcome: Do you have 20 or more people confirmed for your corporate event? We can make room for your whole team! Give us a shout and let us know about your upcoming event. That way, we can block off your desired day so you can have our entire facility to yourself.
  • Safety First: We take safety very seriously at Lumber Jill's. As such, we have implemented several safety rules to protect your team and ensure they have the best time possible.

Birthdays, Celebrations, and Reunions, Oh My!

In addition to our standard reservations, we are happy to offer celebration, corporate, and full facility rental packages. Planning a surprise birthday party for your best friend? Celebrating a life event with that special someone? Looking for a spot for your family reunion? Axe throwing in Seabrook Island, SC is the perfect activity for your group! For the most memorable (or hazy) celebration, don't forget to ask us about alcoholic beverage service and additional lane time.

If you want to spice up your next birthday party or take your bachelorette party to the next level, our celebration package is the perfect fit. This package includes:
  • 2 lanes
  • 1 designated coach
  • 1.5 hours of axe throwing
  • Free shirt for a special guest
  • Table coverings
  • 1 drink for each guest
  • 12 axe throwers
  • 45 total minutes of throwing time
 Axe Throwing Location Seabrook Island, SC

Please note that our celebration package is designed for customers over the age of 12. Two adults must be present at all times.

Common Questions. Helpful Answers.

We understand that axe throwing isn't your typical date night or even guy's night activity. We get it - you're hurling real axes at a target that is only a few feet away. On the surface, that can sound a little scary. But don't worry, many of our first-time guests have questions about how our process works too.

This is a great question and one that we receive quite often (crazy, right?). Axe throwing at Lumber Jill's is absolutely safe. In fact, safety is our #1 priority and has been since day one. Our knowledgeable axe-throwing coaches are trained to keep a keen eye on every axe thrower, whether they're solo or with a group. If, for ANY REASON our coaches feel like a person shouldn't throw an axe, they will not be permitted to do so. To help keep our facility safe, please refrain from bringing your own axe to Lumber Jill's. The same goes for any other kind of throwable object.
The easiest, fastest way to book your axe-throwing lane is to make your reservation online. Walk-ins are welcomed, but we cannot guarantee that we will have a spot open for you or your party. For inquiries about corporate events, facility rentals, or large celebrations, please contact us directly at (843)-879-3030.
We suggest you wear something that you find comfy and easy to wear for a few hours. Don't wear anything that will restrict your movement. The biggest "no-no" we have in terms of dress code is open-toed shoes, which are not allowed. If you pop in for a last-minute axe-throwing session, and need a pair of shoes, don't fret. We offer shoe rentals for $3 per person.
Unfortunately, we are not permitted to allow outside axes at Lumber Jill's. The same goes for any other object like throwing stars or throwing knives. We've got all you need to have the time of your life, including throwing axes.
Yes, absolutely. We are proud to have a wide selection of alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks to keep you cool and hydrated. If you're feeling hangry, don't worry. We have plenty of tasty snacks to munch on if your tummy starts to rumble.

Axe of Kindness

One of the best parts of owning Lumber Jill's is our ability to give back to our local community. We are always on the hunt for new, inventive ways to serve our citizens. That's why, once a month, we host Axe of Kindness night to shine a light on an important organization, charity, or good cause. These exciting events give our customers a compelling way to make a real difference in someone's life.

If you have a donation request or are interested in hosting a fundraiser with Lumber Jill's, send us your info at

aok@throwlumberjills.com.

Latest News in Seabrook Island, SC

Why Southerners Vacation in the Same Spot Time After Time

My family spends every 4th of July at the beach. It's the same beach every year—the beach where I grew up vacationing, where my dad grew up spending weekends and summers, where his parents and his grandparents did before that. My family is spread out across the South now—in Georgia, Alabama, and Texas—but come the first week of July, we always gather in the same spot on Florida's Forgotten Coast, just as my dad's family always has.My family is not alone in having a holiday tradition locked to a specific location. Loa...

My family spends every 4th of July at the beach. It's the same beach every year—the beach where I grew up vacationing, where my dad grew up spending weekends and summers, where his parents and his grandparents did before that. My family is spread out across the South now—in Georgia, Alabama, and Texas—but come the first week of July, we always gather in the same spot on Florida's Forgotten Coast, just as my dad's family always has.

My family is not alone in having a holiday tradition locked to a specific location. Loads of families do, whether it's a rental you and your family return to year after year or a home that's been passed down through generations like mine. You see, in the South, we understand the importance of creating core memories associated with a place. We know that new adventures and destinations are fun and all, but there's also something nostalgic and comforting about coming to a home away from home—even on vacation.

In thinking about the why behind this, I started counting my friends who have family traditions and vacations of their own. Trips they take every year. The friends I know will always be away for a week at the end of August or have the same Memorial Day plans. I don't have to ask where they're going, and there's no point in extending an invitation someplace new. After years of friendship, I know what they'll be doing. Their holiday plans have and will always be set.

Every year, my friend Gavin Blue spends a week with her family at Figure 8 Island in North Carolina. They've been visiting from their home in McLean, Virginia, for the last 30 years—at first as a family reunion of sorts with her dad's side and now as an annual trip for her immediate family. "It's the one vacation a year that I truly try to 'unplug' and detach from reality for a week once I get past the gate house and over the drawbridge," she says. "I cannot imagine a summer without our Figure 8 week."

When asked what makes this beach week so special, Gavin tells me how the people, and the houses, and the traditions have changed over time, as their family has expanded and friends and boyfriends have tagged along. But she says, every year, the island is the same.

"Some of my cousins and aunt and uncles from my dad's side have gradually started coming again the same week we go and it's evolved into us renting homes across the street from one another," she adds. "We set up at the beach starting around 10 a.m. and don't typically head back to our homes until 6 p.m. or until high tide gets us, whichever comes first. Even though we are all adults now, we've still got family beach game tournaments and family dinners and cousin-only dinners throughout the week."

She says she can't wait to continue the tradition when she and her husband have children one day.

For my friend Laura Wilson, that place is Seabrook Island in South Carolina. Her family discovered the idyllic beach community in more recent years, but she says it's since become their go-to summer beach destination. They now spend a week there every summer, renting different houses year after year, each she describes as "so cute and so welcoming."

"We love the restaurants and shops at Seabrook, and will usually pepper in a shopping trip or dinner in Charleston, which isn't a far drive," she says. "One of my favorite activities is biking around the beautiful Seabrook roads in the early evening, watching the sunset through the Spanish moss-covered trees."

Last year, Laura's husband joined the trip for the first time. "Seabrook proved that as our family grows, it will continue to be a place we can all visit and make memories together," she explains. "The more the merrier!"

3 local waterways with high levels of reported bacteria

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- With heat index values expected to boost feels-like temperatures into the mid-100s this weekend, Lowcountry residents and visitors will no doubt be searching for a way to cool off.And while a dip in one of the area’s many swimming holes or the Charleston harbor may seem like the perfect idea, there are a few local waterways with high levels of bacteria making them an...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- With heat index values expected to boost feels-like temperatures into the mid-100s this weekend, Lowcountry residents and visitors will no doubt be searching for a way to cool off.

And while a dip in one of the area’s many swimming holes or the Charleston harbor may seem like the perfect idea, there are a few local waterways with high levels of bacteria making them an unsafe option.

Out of 20 tested sites, Charleston Waterkeeper reported high levels of Enterococcus bacteria at 4 sites– Hendricks Park, upper Ellis Creek, and two portions of Shem Creek.

Bacteria results over 104 MPN/100 mL mean water quality is poor and with more rain in the area this week, there are still high results lingering.

“When bacteria levels are high, that means pathogens may also be present. We’re talking about things like Cholera, Tuberculosis, Staph, Vibrio, some really nasty things that can get you sick. So its important that you pay attention to the data,” said Andrew Wunderley, the Executive Director of Charleston Waterkeeper.

Looking to the North, bacteria levels in the Ashley River have come down, returning that spot to GREEN status. Unfortunately, Hendricks Park remains RED despite numbers coming down from last week, meaning swimming and other water-based activities should be avoided in Filbin Creek.

Boaters and swimmers in the Charleston Harbor should have no worries as all points of the Harbor from Melton Demetre Park to Patriots Point are clear.

As expected, things look a little dicier in Mount Pleasant. There’s no trouble in the lower reaches at Shem Creek Park, but the boat landing and residential portions are not a safe option this week. The Cove and Hobcaw Creek both look good to go, though!

Mixed news continues as we head to James Island where Ellis Creek is RED in the upper reaches, but GREEN in the lower reaches. All GREENS for the rest of the island at Sol Legare, Clark Sound, and the Folly River.

Want to launch the boat from somewhere new this weekend? Wappoo Cut Boat Ramp is a great option as it shows no signs of high bacteria levels.

No signs of trouble at the beaches either where Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island are both GREEN according to the latest DHEC data. No data was collected for Folly Beach, Kiawah Island, or Seabrook Island this week.

You can explore the map here.

Seabrook Island neighbors push for short-term rental cap, mayor says no cap needed

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Seabrook Island neighbors are petitioning their leaders to cap the number of short-term rentals, stating there is overcrowding due to what they called over-tourism, but the mayor said the town has no plans to do so.Seabrook Island homeowner Ted Flerlage says over 700 of his neighbors want to cap the number of short-term rentals on the island.“What we’re trying to do is cap, not end the process of short-term rentals, cap at roughly the present numbers, evaluate what happens after that,&...

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Seabrook Island neighbors are petitioning their leaders to cap the number of short-term rentals, stating there is overcrowding due to what they called over-tourism, but the mayor said the town has no plans to do so.

Seabrook Island homeowner Ted Flerlage says over 700 of his neighbors want to cap the number of short-term rentals on the island.

“What we’re trying to do is cap, not end the process of short-term rentals, cap at roughly the present numbers, evaluate what happens after that,” Flerlage said, “and then, determine whether or not we should lower the number of short-term rentals.”

As of June 19, there are 484 of these properties on the island, which residents said has led to overcrowding on the island’s streets and amenities.

Mayor John Gregg said for this year, data gathered over the past few months suggest otherwise.

“We’re not going to be looking at imposing limitations on the number of short-term rental units,” Gregg said.

Coastal Getaways owner Nancy Buck said more people are starting to call the island home, and good rentals are full for around 40% of the year.

She says all of her clients are property owners who rent to help offset the costs of the amenities, taxes and insurance.

“We’ve also gone from 35% permanent residents to 60% residents in the last two years,” Buck said. “Twenty-five percent of the properties have turned over since 2019.”

Buck also adds the majority of the amenities are mostly used by members and not rental guests.

However, the homeowners want the town’s government to hear them out.

“I’d like him to reconsider,” Flerlage said. “I’d like him to look at the reality and listen to the people who are property owners here, the residents on the island. You know, 700 people is a big number.”

“Let’s wait and see how this year goes,” Buck said. “They instituted the short-term rental ordinance couple of years ago, or actually, last year, so let’s give it a full year to see how it goes.”

Both Buck and the homeowners said they want to work out their differences over the next several months to come up with a solution that works for everyone.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Commentary: Declining red knots need our help

Each year, the Palmetto State plays a vital role in one of Mother Nature’s most impressive feats, when countless red knots flock to the S.C. coast as part of their annual 19,000-mile migration. After leaving their South American wintering grounds, these brilliantly colored shorebirds arrive on our shores in early March to feast on clams, mussels and horseshoe-crab eggs before heading to their Arctic nesting grounds in May and early June.Thanks to a growing body of research, our knowledge about these medium-size shorebirds is exp...

Each year, the Palmetto State plays a vital role in one of Mother Nature’s most impressive feats, when countless red knots flock to the S.C. coast as part of their annual 19,000-mile migration. After leaving their South American wintering grounds, these brilliantly colored shorebirds arrive on our shores in early March to feast on clams, mussels and horseshoe-crab eggs before heading to their Arctic nesting grounds in May and early June.

Thanks to a growing body of research, our knowledge about these medium-size shorebirds is expanding all the time. For instance, we know that as many as 41% of the remaining red knot population touches down on Seabrook and Kiawah islands each spring, according to a study published by Pelton, et al., this year in bioRxiv. Research conducted in 2018 by coastal bird biologists at the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources also found that two-thirds of the red knots that visit our state each year use South Carolina as their final U.S. stopover on their long northward journey.

Statistics like these demonstrate just how significant our state is in the lifecycle of these remarkable animals. Unfortunately, red knot populations have declined a staggering 87% since 2000, and more than 94% since the 1980s in some areas of the Atlantic Coast. In 2014, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the species as federally endangered, pointing to three primary factors contributing to its decline: human and predator disturbance, habitat loss from sea level rise and development, and reduced prey availability. We at Audubon South Carolina, along with other like-minded organizations and individuals, are committed to addressing these threats to give red knots a fighting chance at survival.

To limit human and predator disturbance to shorebirds, we work hard to educate beachgoers about the importance of red knots and other vulnerable bird species. With the help of hundreds of trained volunteers known as Audubon Shorebird Stewards, we post informational signs, mark off sensitive habitat and educate the public on how to share the shore safely with birds. Without this information, people and pets can unwittingly frighten or “flush” coastal birds by chasing them or simply walking too close. As a result, red knots waste precious time and energy fleeing perceived threats rather than eating the food they need to survive their long migration.

To address habitat loss from rising seas and development, it’s important to protect the last remaining slivers of undeveloped coast that red knots need to survive. In Charleston County, this includes places such as Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge and Crab Bank and Deveaux Bank seabird sanctuaries, and even residential communities such as Seabrook Island’s north beach.

Finally, growing scientific evidence points to lack of prey species availability as perhaps the greatest threat to red knot survival. Although red knots eat many different types of marine invertebrates, research shows they prefer horseshoe-crab eggs, probably because they are two to three times more nutrient-dense than other food sources.

It might surprise some to learn that the greatest competition for this critical red knot food source is the U.S. biomedical industry, which relies on a unique component in horseshoe crab blood to test the purity of medicines and equipment. Since the start of the pandemic, horseshoe crab harvesting has increased sharply to keep pace with soaring demand, creating serious concerns for both horseshoe crab and red knot populations. In addition to diminishing a most critical food source, the process of harvesting crabs itself can disturb red knot foraging.

To fully understand and address the problem, Audubon South Carolina supports greater transparency among all public and private parties involved in horseshoe crab harvesting. For instance, having access to data that show how many horseshoe crabs are collected and from where, as well as horseshoe crab mortality rates and egg density levels in the sand, can identify a definitive path toward helping the red knot population recover. We also support the federal Fish and Wildlife Service’s full list of proposed critical habitat areas for red knot, which would create greater protections for the species.

The challenges that red knots and other coastal birds face are immense but not insurmountable. The fate of this amazing species, and so many others, is in all our hands. Please do your part by sharing the beach with shorebirds, advocating for habitat protection and encouraging your elected officials to support greater transparency in horseshoe crab harvesting data.

Nolan Schillerstrom is Audubon South Carolina’s coastal program manager.

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10 South Carolina Beaches You Should Visit This Summer

Breathtaking beaches may be found all along the beautiful South Carolina coast. Tourists shall try one of the secret beaches on seldom frequented barrier islands if they want to escape away to their own quiet stretch of heaven. These sandy sanctuaries may be found all along the state's coastline, from SC's southernmost point to North Myrtle Beach, and offer a peaceful location to wander down the beach, look for shells, or...

Breathtaking beaches may be found all along the beautiful South Carolina coast. Tourists shall try one of the secret beaches on seldom frequented barrier islands if they want to escape away to their own quiet stretch of heaven. These sandy sanctuaries may be found all along the state's coastline, from SC's southernmost point to North Myrtle Beach, and offer a peaceful location to wander down the beach, look for shells, or simply soak up the sun. Only accessible by boat, most of the mesmerizing islands have remained undeveloped, preserving the beach in its natural state. Here are the best 10 underrated South Carolina beaches.

Charleston's Barrier Islands

A post shared by CARMELLE & ALLEN NEWMAN (@noblegroupsellscharleston)

Charleston has evolved to become one of the most popular tourist destinations in the United States, garnering several honors from travel journals. The interesting history, enchanting charm, and tasty gastronomy are all appealing, but tourists can also extend their vacation by a few days to visit some of the greatest beaches in the South. Only 45 minutes to an hour from downtown, the splendid peninsula of Charleston is encircled by barrier islands. There are several beautiful beaches to visit in the area!

Bulls Island

Bulls Island is the biggest of four barrier islands in the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, and it stands along with one of the most pristine stretches of shoreline on the east coast. The famous and unique Boneyard Beach, where the remnants of surf-battered trees are sprawled over the sand, is one of its seven miles of beaches. A ferry to the island is available for tourists, as well as a variety of guided excursions such as a Bulls Island sunrise tour, beach drop, kayak trip, and multiday adventure.

Capers Island

Travelers shall visit this state history preserve, located 15 miles (24km) north of Charleston at the southwestern edge of the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, on a picturesque kayak or boat tour. Along with a beautiful beach, they will be able to see a variety of dazzling birds, including endangered brown pelicans and ruddy turnstones. On the island, 294 different kinds of migrating birds have been sighted. Capers Island, like Bulls Island, features a "Boneyard Beach" formed by years of erosion.

Daufuskie Island

The splendid Daufuskie Island, located directly over Calibogue Sound from Hilton Head Island, will make its visitors feel a million miles away from society. It's not uncommon to observe no one when walking along the bewitching white sand beaches. To get to Daufuskie, travelers have to take a boat or water taxi from Hilton Head to Freeport Marina's public pier, then hire a golf cart and drive all the way across the island to the beach. They should not miss out on seeing the astonishing remainder of this remote South Carolina sea island and its numerous wonderful historical monuments while they're there.

Morris Island

This amazing 840-acre deserted island is located at the mouth of Charleston Harbor, across Lighthouse Inlet from Folly Beach, and is known for its historic 19th-century lighthouse. The incredible 150-foot brick structure now remains in the ocean just offshore after years of degradation. The stunning beach, on the other hand, is as lovely as ever, and it's an awesome place to hunt for seashells, especially sand dollars. Morris Island may be visited on a boat or kayak excursion organized by local outfitters.

Folly Beach

Folly Beach, South Carolina, is renowned as the "Edge of America" and is one of Charleston's most beautiful, well-known, and famous beaches. The Washout is a notable surfing area on the island's awesome eastern edge. If tourists continue walking until they reach a cul-de-sac, they may stroll to an abandoned road with hurricane-damaged foundations covered in colorful graffiti. A rookery of pelicans may also be seen where the Atlantic Ocean meets the clear water of Folly River.

Seabrook Island

The magnificent Seabrook Island has been home to soldiers, pirates, and well-to-do Charleston families over the years. The Seabrook Island Club is now a private community with beach access and vacation rentals. The splendid beaches are exclusively available to members and visitors due to the island's setup. The bewitching untouched sand is unlike any other beach in South Carolina. Aside from the beaches, Seabrook Island's tourists may ride their bikes throughout the land. Marsh rabbits, sea turtles, whitetail deer, and alligators are just a few of the fauna worth seeing.

Isle of Palms

The unique Isle of Palms is a high-end destination. Although the beautiful beach is still available to the public, there are several places that are only accessible if visitors stay at a resort or rent a unit. Beach access is available at Isle of Palms County Park, along with expert seasonal lifeguards and a dedicated swimming area for children. An exciting playground and marvelous picnic areas are also available.

The Grand Strand

The astonishing "Grand Strand," which runs between the Little River and Georgetown on the northern coast of South Carolina, is the state's greatest stretch of beautiful beach. The Waccamaw tribe used to live here until Europeans arrived after the American Revolution. Every year, millions of people visit this area, particularly the impressive Myrtle Beach. Unlike several other regions of the state, the Grand Strand has public access to all of its marvelous beaches. Family-friendly attractions are well-known in the area.

Pawleys Island

The tranquil and magical area of Pawleys Island, one of the region's oldest resort areas, is the first stop on the tourist's route north on King's Highway. There are a few fancy golf clubs and resorts on the "mainland" side of town, but visitors cannot access the beach from there. However, if they cross a beautiful little inlet, they will be on the wonderful island itself. They can also visit Otis Beach, which is a popular public beach.

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This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
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