Throw Lumber Jill’s | 4650 Ladson Road | Suite 205 Summerville, SC 29485

Axe throwing in Seabrook Island SC

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The Most Exciting Live Entertainment Game in South Carolina

If you’re looking for an adrenaline-filled, pulse-pounding way to have fun all day, grab an axe and get your throw on at Lumber Jill’s! Axe throwing is the newest, most popular live entertainment game in the Lowcountry. It’s kind of like darts…but with axes! Axe throwing is great for a few hours of amusement, stress relief, team building, and even corporate events in Seabrook Island, SC. Whether you’re looking for a great way to celebrate the weekend or want a new idea for your company event, Lumber Jill’s has got you covered.

The Lumber Jill’s revolution began after co-owners Jill and Heath spent a date night with friends throwing axes in Charleston. After having so much fun, the entrepreneurial couple quickly realized they could create their own take on axe throwing. Soon after, Lumber Jill’s was born!

The name Lumber Jill’s isn’t just a play on our co-owner’s name – it involves a really interesting piece of history too. Across the pond, the Women’s Timber Corps “manned” the lumber yards in England while the men were serving in WWII. They affectionately became known as Lumberjills, Britain’s answer to Rosie the Riveter. Without these brave ladies, Lumber Jill’s wouldn’t exist. We would be remiss if we didn’t salute them for the example they set!

At the end of the day, we want to provide every one of our guests with an outstanding axe-throwing experience. So, grab your friends, co-workers, family, or favorite people and join us for an axe-throwing party you won’t soon forget.

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The Most Exciting Live Entertainment Game in South Carolina

Why is Axe Throwing in Seabrook Island, SC So Popular?

Axes haven’t been this popular in America since “The Shining” hit theaters way back in 1980!

In cities all around the nation, axe-throwing facilities are popping up left and right as a fun, healthy way for people of all ages to congregate and enjoy a night of friendly competition and stress relief. In the last few years, the sport of axe throwing has exploded – so much so that the World Axe Throwing League was assembled in 2017 to coordinate international axe-throwing competitions. Since that time, many axe-throwing events have popped up on national TV stations like ESPN.

Axe Throwing
But why is axe throwing so popular? Here are just a few reasons why Lumber Jill’s and axe throwing as a whole is a hit in South Carolina:
stress-relief
Stress Relief

Perhaps the most popular reason folks love axe throwing in Seabrook Island is for stress relief. We’ve even heard some customers say it’s a cheaper form of therapy! In reality, axe tossing gives you a therapeutic release that is hard to replicate. A few hard throws with an axe and your body releases a flood of endorphins, which help increase your energy, improve your mood, and facilitate healthy blood flow. If you have pent-up anger, nothing feels better than chucking a heavy axe at a target. Hitting a bullseye is even better!

exercise
Exercise

Since axe throwing is such an exhilarating activity, many people don’t realize that they are exercising their arms, legs, abs, pecs, and even back when they come to Lumber Jill’s. Like high-intensity interval training (HIIT) workouts, axe throwing works several muscle groups at once. These exercises strengthen your core and help define your muscles. When coupled with a healthy diet, regular axe-throwing activities can even help you shed a few pounds.

Corporate Comradery
Corporate Comradery

You might be surprised to hear that axe throwing is one of the most sought-after company event ideas in Seabrook Island, SC. Sure, your colleagues might think it’s a little weird to host a corporate meeting at an axe-throwing facility. But once your co-worker hits their target, they’ll quickly understand how much fun they can have. Perhaps more importantly, axe tossing is a safe, fun way to conduct trust exercises and build team morale overall.

Unique Way to Have Fun
Unique Way to Have Fun

When you get right down to it, axe throwing is good, clean, healthy fun. Axe throwing helps relieve shoulder tension, while laughing helps engage your body’s core. When you throw in an adult beverage or two, laughs become easier and fun flows more freely. You can’t help but have the time of your life at Lumber Jill’s in the Lowcountry.

Family Fun
Family Fun

Axe throwing isn’t reserved only for adults – kids can get in on the fun and excitement too. Our warm, inviting atmosphere inspires people to embrace their inner champion, even if they’re under 18. At Lumber Jill’s, we can accommodate kids ages 10 and up. Before we pass them an axe, we will evaluate their skill level to ensure their safety. Contact us today for more info on birthday celebrations and whole facility rentals.

Friday is Family Fun Night

$80 for Family of Four

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At Your Next Corporate Event

Status quote, average, ordinary…these are qualities that no employer would want out of their employees. So, why host a team-building event at a venue with the same characteristics?

If you’re on the hunt for corporate event venues in Seabrook Island, SC, you just hit the jackpot. We may be a little biased, but Lumber Jill’s is a fantastic corporate event venue for companies looking to try something new.

Axe throwing for corporate events is fun, high-energy, and safe for all your employees. We’re talking an adrenaline-filled day with your own private axe-throwing lanes. Get your clients or your team out of the office and give them something to be excited about!

Here are just a few reasons to reserve our facility for your company get together:

Bury the Hatchet at Your Next Corporate Event
  • No Suit or Tie Required: Feel like taking a casual day? No judgments here! The only thing that matters is that you hit your target (or try your best to do so).
  • No Rain Delays: Unlike some outdoor venues, Lumber Jill’s won’t delay or cancel your event if it starts raining outside. We’re here to make your corporate event more fun, rain or shine.
  • Skill Not Required: Never thrown an axe in your life? Have poor hand-to-eye coordination? Don’t sweat it. Our coaches are know how to teach first-timers the positions and techniques they need to have a blast.
  • Large Groups Welcome: Do you have 20 or more people confirmed for your corporate event? We can make room for your whole team! Give us a shout and let us know about your upcoming event. That way, we can block off your desired day so you can have our entire facility to yourself.
  • Safety First: We take safety very seriously at Lumber Jill’s. As such, we have implemented several safety rules to protect your team and ensure they have the best time possible.

Birthdays, Celebrations, and Reunions, Oh My!

In addition to our standard reservations, we are happy to offer celebration, corporate, and full facility rental packages. Planning a surprise birthday party for your best friend? Celebrating a life event with that special someone? Looking for a spot for your family reunion? Axe throwing in Seabrook Island, SC is the perfect activity for your group! For the most memorable (or hazy) celebration, don’t forget to ask us about alcoholic beverage service and additional lane time.

If you want to spice up your next birthday party or take your bachelorette party to the next level, our celebration package is the perfect fit. This package includes:
  • 2 lanes
  • 1 designated coach
  • 1.5 hours of axe throwing
  • Free shirt for a special guest
  • Table coverings
  • 1 drink for each guest
  • 12 axe throwers
  • 45 total minutes of throwing time
Birthdays, Celebrations, and Reunions, Oh My!

Please note that our celebration package is designed for customers over the age of 12. Two adults must be present at all times.

Common Questions. Helpful Answers.

We understand that axe throwing isn’t your typical date night or even guy’s night activity. We get it – you’re hurling real axes at a target that is only a few feet away. On the surface, that can sound a little scary. But don’t worry, many of our first-time guests have questions about how our process works too.

This is a great question and one that we receive quite often (crazy, right?). Axe throwing at Lumber Jill’s is absolutely safe. In fact, safety is our #1 priority and has been since day one. Our knowledgeable axe-throwing coaches are trained to keep a keen eye on every axe thrower, whether they’re solo or with a group. If, for ANY REASON our coaches feel like a person shouldn’t throw an axe, they will not be permitted to do so. To help keep our facility safe, please refrain from bringing your own axe to Lumber Jill’s. The same goes for any other kind of throwable object.
The easiest, fastest way to book your axe-throwing lane is to make your reservation online. Walk-ins are welcomed, but we cannot guarantee that we will have a spot open for you or your party. For inquiries about corporate events, facility rentals, or large celebrations, please contact us directly at (843)-879-3030.
We suggest you wear something that you find comfy and easy to wear for a few hours. Don’t wear anything that will restrict your movement. The biggest “no-no” we have in terms of dress code is open-toed shoes, which are not allowed. If you pop in for a last-minute axe-throwing session, and need a pair of shoes, don’t fret. We offer shoe rentals for $3 per person.
Unfortunately, we are not permitted to allow outside axes at Lumber Jill’s. The same goes for any other object like throwing stars or throwing knives. We’ve got all you need to have the time of your life, including throwing axes.
Yes, absolutely. We are proud to have a wide selection of alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks to keep you cool and hydrated. If you’re feeling hangry, don’t worry. We have plenty of tasty snacks to munch on if your tummy starts to rumble.

Axe of Kindness

One of the best parts of owning Lumber Jill’s is our ability to give back to our local community. We are always on the hunt for new, inventive ways to serve our citizens. That’s why, once a month, we host Axe of Kindness night to shine a light on an important organization, charity, or good cause. These exciting events give our customers a compelling way to make a real difference in someone’s life.

If you have a donation request or are interested in hosting a fundraiser with Lumber Jill’s, send us your info at

aok@throwlumberjills.com.

Latest News in Seabrook Island

Seabrook Island Birding Activities To Make For Jubilant January

By Jackie Brooks for The Island ConnectionJanuary is a busy month for area birders. Lots of opportunities to improve your birding skills as you participate in the many activities available.You do not have to be a Seabrook Island resident.We welcome all levels of interest and ability. To see all programs being offered in January as well as to register for any that you would like to join, go to our website, SeabrookIslandBirders.org under Birding Activities.If you are not yet a 2022 SIB member, you may first become ...

By Jackie Brooks for The Island Connection

January is a busy month for area birders. Lots of opportunities to improve your birding skills as you participate in the many activities available.

You do not have to be a Seabrook Island resident.

We welcome all levels of interest and ability. To see all programs being offered in January as well as to register for any that you would like to join, go to our website, SeabrookIslandBirders.org under Birding Activities.

If you are not yet a 2022 SIB member, you may first become a member for only $10 by following the instructions on our website, visit seabrookislandbirders.org/ contact/join-sib/. You may bring the form and your dues to the event. Or you may pay the Guest Fee of $5.

Learning Together at North Beach

Saturday, Jan. 8, 2022 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Location: Meet at Boardwalk # 1 Parking lot

Max: none

Cost: Free for members; $5 donation for guests

Join SIB to bird at Seabrook Island’s North Beach. This three-mile round trip walk travels from Board Walk #1 to the tip of North Beach along Captain Sams Inlet as high tide approaches.

Birders from beginners to advanced birders will enjoy the variety of birds found on North Beach.

At this time, many different species of shorebirds rest and feed near the point or along the beach ridge near the beach’s pond. Along the way, we will explore the many different species that can be found in this unique area. As always, be sure to bring your binoculars/cameras, hats and sunscreen.

Bring a spotting scope if you have one. There should be spotting scopes available for viewing.

Bring plenty to drink and a snack if desired. There are no facilities. We ask that all participants wear a mask when unable to social distance if they are not vaccinated.

January Movie Bird Brain

Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2022 from 4-5 p.m.

Location: Zoom

Watch astonishing tests of avian aptitude: parrots that can plan for the future, jackdaws that can “read” human faces, and crows that can solve multi-step puzzles with tools like pebbles, sticks, and hooks. Could these just be clever tricks, based on instinct or triggered by subtle cues from their human handlers? Please sign up to join us for an afternoon at the movies! Sign Up by Jan. 10 and you will receive an automatic confirmation with your link for Zoom. It will be resent to you on the day of the program.

Learning Together-Palmetto Lake

Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022 4 p.m. – sunset

Location: Meet at Equestrian end of Lake House parking lot

Max: 15

Cost: Free for 2022 members, $5 for guests

Description: Join the Seabrook Island Birders for a leisurely walk around Palmetto Lake.

We plan to walk part way along the path towards the Equestrian Center then hopefully see the “white birds” come in to roost for the evening. The path around Palmetto Lake is wheelchair navigable and for those walking it will be probably only a quarter of a mile. As we walk along Seabrook Island Road, we hope to see some of our resident winter warblers such as Yellow-rumped Warblers, Palm Warblers and my favorite Black and White Warbler. We also expect to see a large variety of birds including Northern Cardinals, Carolina Wrens, Herons and birds of prey. If the “white birds” get the invitation, we hope to see Snowy Egrets, Great Egrets and White Ibis roosting for the evening. Hooded Mergansers, Pie-billed Grebes and Buffleheads may be seen swimming in the lake. Dress in layers and bring your binoculars, hats, and a beverage of choice. You may also wish to bring a chair to sit and enjoy your beverage while watching the birds coming in for their evening roost.

Beyond Our Backyard at Kiawah River Development

Sunday, Jan. 16, 2022 8-11 a.m.

Location: Meet at the “bridge” entering the property

Cost: None for members; $5 donation for guests

Another chance to check out birds that can be found on this varied habitat property. We expect to see a large variety of birds including Double-crested Cormorants, Egrets, Herons, Osprey and other birds of prey. If we are lucky, we will see an eagle and osprey duel over a fish. We should also see and hear some of the smaller birds like Tufted Titmice, Eastern Bluebirds, Northern Cardinals. We will drive to various locations on the property and then walk for better birding observations. Of course ,this also gives us a chance to see this neighboring development. As always, be sure to bring your binoculars, hats, water and sunscreen.

Center for Birds of Prey

Date: Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022

Registration starts 7 p.m. Program starts 7:30 p.m.

Location: Live Oak Hall, Lake House, Seabrook Island, SC

Program Fee: Members $5.00

Attendance: Limited to 100 members

If you are not a 2022 SIB Member, you can join/renew for $10/year

Stephen Schabel, Center for Birds of Prey Director of Education, once again brings the Center’s amazing raptors to the Lake House.

We’ll witness the interesting and important world of raptors through this unique indoor program.

Stephen’s engaging discussion, along with watching the birds in action, will give us a wonderful education of these majestic creatures and the significant role they play as apex avian predators. The program is limited to 100 SIB members. SIPOA COVID protocol will be followed – masks required in Live Oak Hall, masks and physical distancing recommended while traversing other indoor space. No refreshments will be served. If COVID conditions change prior to Jan. 19 the program could be canceled.

For registration, visit seabrookislandbirders.org/.

Record year for annual MUSC fundraising event

The pandemic might be testing this country’s patience, but it certainly isn’t affecting its philanthropy. Over the holidays, a record $1,863,144 was raised for the Medical University of South Carolina as a part of Giving Tuesday.Created in 2012, Giving Tuesday started with a modest goal: do something good in the world. Since then, the Tuesday following Thanksgiving has grown into a global giving movement and the biggest giving day of the year in th...

The pandemic might be testing this country’s patience, but it certainly isn’t affecting its philanthropy. Over the holidays, a record $1,863,144 was raised for the Medical University of South Carolina as a part of Giving Tuesday.

Created in 2012, Giving Tuesday started with a modest goal: do something good in the world. Since then, the Tuesday following Thanksgiving has grown into a global giving movement and the biggest giving day of the year in the world. In 2017, MUSC got in on the action, and in that year and the subsequent four years, raised nearly $800,000. This year alone exceeded that cumulative total by more than $1 million.

“We are humbled by the generosity of this community,” said Kate Azizi, vice president for Institutional Advancement.

Even though MUSC is considered a state-funded organization, in reality, less than 4% of its annual budget comes from the government. That’s why donations are so critical. All the money raised on Giving Tuesday goes to the MUSC Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that has supported MUSC in its lifesaving mission since 1966. This time around, gifts ranged from $5 up to nearly $500,000.

More than half a million dollars of the donated money will go to scholarships for MUSC students. The MUSC Alumni Association donated $450,000, with a portion dedicated to enhancing diversity across MUSC’s entire student body. Donors inspired by the generosity of MUSC’s alumni gave an additional $80,000 to a variety of scholarships at MUSC’s six colleges.

“Diversity and inclusion are central to our mission and pursuit of excellence,” said MUSC President David J. Cole, M.D., FACS, “and increasing scholarship support is critical to reaching this goal. We are grateful to the Alumni Association, our alumni and the community for making scholarships a priority on Giving Tuesday.”

In addition to scholarships, money raised on Giving Tuesday will advance research, enhance patient care and help to meet MUSC’s other greatest needs across the enterprise.

The single largest gift from an individual came from Pam Harrington. The nearly $500,000 she gave will help to provide emergency care and other medical services to residents of Johns, Kiawah and Seabrook islands. More specifically, it will support the building of the new Sea Islands Medical Pavilion, which will serve those island communities.

Hank and Laurel Greer, who made the largest single gift on Giving Tuesday last year, generously gave again to the MUSC Health Heart and Vascular Center. Their gift of $250,000 will support the Hank and Laurel Greer Endowed Chair in Electrophysiology. An endowed chair is a prestigious honor and a powerful tool for recruiting and retaining world-renowned leaders in patient care, education and research.

Gifts of all sizes have the power to change what’s possible at MUSC. Of the more than 300 gifts the MUSC Foundation received on Giving Tuesday, approximately 95% were less than $10,000, and 86% were less than $1,000.

Dozens shared why they gave, on the MUSC Foundation’s Giving Tuesday activity page. Here are a few of the highlights:

Azizi wants donors to know just how meaningful their gifts are. “Your incredible support of MUSC’s mission will make a profound impact on countless lives,” she said . “We can’t thank you enough.”

Seabrook neighbors’ spat over drainage pipe decided by SC Supreme Court

SEABROOK ISLAND — A neighborly dispute over a drainage pipe made it all the way to the S.C. Supreme Court last year, and justices recently decided the yearslong case will be resolved with just $1,000 in damages.It’s not uncommon for neighbors in the flood-prone Lowcountry to clash over drainage issues, but few cases make it to the state’s highest court.The seeds of the legal conflict were sown in 2002, when Paul Dennis McLaughlin and Susan Rode McLaughlin bought a lot on the island to build a home there, accor...

SEABROOK ISLAND — A neighborly dispute over a drainage pipe made it all the way to the S.C. Supreme Court last year, and justices recently decided the yearslong case will be resolved with just $1,000 in damages.

It’s not uncommon for neighbors in the flood-prone Lowcountry to clash over drainage issues, but few cases make it to the state’s highest court.

The seeds of the legal conflict were sown in 2002, when Paul Dennis McLaughlin and Susan Rode McLaughlin bought a lot on the island to build a home there, according to court documents. Their lot, like that of neighbors Richard Ralph and Eugenia Ralph, had a “no-build zone” with an underground, corroded drainage pipe.

A different drainage line on the golf course next door was installed that same year. The McLaughlins then spent the next six years talking to the island’s Property Owners Association about whether they could build on the section of their plot with the old pipe. They finally got permission to do so, and in 2008 told builders to remove their portion.

The Ralphs, however, protested that the corroded line was still helping to drain their yard of rainfall. When the McLaughlin’s section was removed, the Ralphs said flooding on their property got worse.

Ainsley Tillman, an attorney for the Ralphs, said the couple’s yard has ponding after it rains, and the standing water has drowned trees on the property.

That’s what led the couple to file their original suit, claiming trespass and intentional infliction of emotional distress, and asking for hundreds of thousands in damages. After a trial they were awarded just $1,000; despite winning, they appealed the amount of the court’s award.

An appeals court agreed there could be a new trial only over the amount of damages awarded. That’s the decision the state Supreme Court reversed on March 17 in a unanimous decision that reinstated the $1,000 payout and ended the case.

Tillman said her clients feel $1,000 is inadequate. Additionally, the legal fees the Ralphs spent so far “have not been insignificant,” Tillman said, but she declined to say exactly how big the bill was.

Hamlin O’Kelley, an attorney for the McLaughlins, declined to comment on the case and said his clients also would not comment.

But the saga may not be over: Tillman said the Ralphs are deciding whether they will ask the Supreme Court to re-hear the case, as they hope for a higher damage amount.

“When you are deciding whether or not to pursue an appeal in a case, they weigh the cost of litigation against the damage to your property,” Tillman said. “That’s kind of the balancing test.”

MUSC Health plans new medical office building, free-standing ER on Johns Island

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — MUSC Health is looking to better serve the sea islands near Charleston and their inhabitants.The health care provider has plans to construct a 22,740-square-foot medical office building along with a free-standing emergency room.With this space, MUSC Health hopes to be more accessible to patients living on Johns Island, Kiawah Island and Seabrook Island. Officials cited the distance of the islands from the nearest hospital and their rapid population growth as some of the factors considered when ...

JOHNS ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — MUSC Health is looking to better serve the sea islands near Charleston and their inhabitants.

The health care provider has plans to construct a 22,740-square-foot medical office building along with a free-standing emergency room.

With this space, MUSC Health hopes to be more accessible to patients living on Johns Island, Kiawah Island and Seabrook Island. Officials cited the distance of the islands from the nearest hospital and their rapid population growth as some of the factors considered when choosing the site.

The new facility will be built at 1884 Seabrook Island Road on Johns Island. Construction is anticipated to start in August 2022 and the building should open to patients by the fall of 2023.

Leaders said the project is being made possible through a land donation from Kiawah Partners, valued at $4.85 million.

“After seven years of working side by side with MUSC to bring this important project to fruition, we could not be prouder to donate the six acres of land needed for the development and to continue our partnership with the MUSC team,” said Chris Randolph, Kiawah Partners. “This new facility will bring vitally important world-class medical care to Kiawah, Seabrook and the Sea Islands residents, which will only add to the exceptional experience that comes with living here.”

“People living in this area have to travel 30 or 45 minutes to reach the nearest hospital, sometimes more depending on traffic. That’s a big problem for someone having a stroke or cardiac event,” added Patrick J. Cawley, M.D., MUSC Health CEO and vice president for Health Affairs, University. “This new facility brings that care directly into the community. We’re extremely grateful to Kiawah Partners for helping to make that possible.”

Some of the amenities include four exam rooms, two trauma rooms, full lab services, CT scan services, radiology services and a helipad on the emergency room side. The medical office will house primary care, specialty care, telehealth pods, an onsite lab and diagnostic treatment, as well as physical and occupational therapy treatment rooms.

"The new medical facility will provide residents and visitors alike with convenient and rapid access to MUSC Health’s emergency care services, select outpatient services, and some of the nation’s top providers in primary and specialty care," MUSC Health stated in an informational handout provided to ABC News 4.

In total, the work is expected to cost around $24 million. MUSC is hoping to raise $15 million of that through private support.

McMillan Pazdan Smith, who is currently working on designs for a new MUSC Health hospital in rural Williamsburg County, will also design this project.

Sea turtle nesting season begins in SC; first nest spotted on Seabrook Island

SEABROOK ISLAND — A few days into sea turtle nesting season and volunteers on Seabrook Island have spotted the state’s first loggerhead nest.The season began May 1 and runs through the end of October.Beachgoers can help sea turtles in the Palmetto State this season by keeping the beaches clean, giving the animals space and turning off beachfront lights to avoid disorientation.Sea turtle volunteers Sandy MacCoss and Lucy Hoover found the state’s first nest of the season May 5 on Seabrook, about 20 miles ...

SEABROOK ISLAND — A few days into sea turtle nesting season and volunteers on Seabrook Island have spotted the state’s first loggerhead nest.

The season began May 1 and runs through the end of October.

Beachgoers can help sea turtles in the Palmetto State this season by keeping the beaches clean, giving the animals space and turning off beachfront lights to avoid disorientation.

Sea turtle volunteers Sandy MacCoss and Lucy Hoover found the state’s first nest of the season May 5 on Seabrook, about 20 miles south of Charleston. The nest was between two boardwalks and had 117 eggs.

“We’re thrilled to be the first in the state, and we’re very excited about the upcoming season,” said Jane Magioncalda, a co-leader of the turtle patrol.

More than 100 volunteers are on the patrol. They walk the beach each morning to see whether a mother turtle came up overnight to lay a nest. If there is evidence of a crawl, a team will probe the area to try and locate the nest.

Magioncalda said that volunteers will sometimes have to relocate the nest if it is below the high tide line and move it up to protect it.

“Then we mark it so that people don’t walk over it,” Magioncalda said. “And we also check those nests every single day during the season until they finally hatch, which is about 60 days after it’s been laid.”

Turtle patrol groups, like the ones on Seabrook and Kiawah islands, are instrumental in helping the state keep records of nests each season.

South Carolina wrapped up the 2020 sea turtle nesting season with about two-thirds more nests than the 10-year average.

Charlotte Hope, a biologist with the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, said the average nests for the past 10 years was 3,324. DNR counted 5,560 nests in 2020.

There are four sea turtle species that nest on beaches in the Palmetto State: loggerhead, green, Kemp’s ridley and leatherback. All four are classified as endangered or threatened and are protected by the Endangered Species Act, plus local and state ordinances.

To further protect these animals, beachgoers are asked to observe them from a distance. People who harm or interfere with the turtles or their nests are subject to civil penalties of up to $25,000 and up to a year in prison, DNR said.

Single-use plastics, such as plastic bags and balloons, are common trash found on the beach and can cause harm or death if sea turtles mistake them for food. DNR recommends people avoid use of these items on the beach.

Many coastal cities and towns in the state have already banned packaging products considered environmentally harmful, like plastic bags.

Folks are also encouraged to boat cautiously, especially in small tidal creeks where sea turtles like to feed. And keep artificial lights off the beach at night during nesting season. This prevents nesting mothers and hatchlings from becoming disoriented.

Sea turtles depend on the brightest light at night to lead them to the water. That light is often the moon. But other lights, such as those coming from within and outside homes, can cause confusion.

Sick, injured or dead sea turtles and nest disturbances should be reported to DNR at 800-922-5431.

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